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Thrawn (Legends vs Canon Novels)


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4 hours ago, The Choc said:

 

The issue with Snoke is that if he does give some backstory on himself, or if Luke does it for him, the info has to be pertinent at the time for the other characters present. If the backstory is only there to give the audience the info then its just poor writing. At what point does Rey need to know how Snoke came back? At what point would she really care?

 

When Luke tells Rey about Ben turning evil and we see the flashback, it could have been as easy as this:

Luke: "Ben had heard a voice calling to him in the darkness... Snoke... and old enemy of the Jedi that had remained hidden for centuries emerged to pick up where The Emperor left off."

The answer did not need to be in depth, It just needed to acknowledge the situation. I always thought it might be interesting if he had been frozen in carbonite or something since before the Clone Wars.

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Over the past few years, I have been burning through the new Thrawn novels by Timothy Zahn as they have come out. Specifically: Thrawn (2017) Thrawn: Alliances (2018) Thrawn: Treas

I enjoyed reading Heir to the Empire, Dark Force Rising, and The Last Command. I think you would have to read all three since they are just one big story. However, that was almost 30 years ago when I

Actually, all of the new canon books Zahn has written so far have been carefully written around EU continuity, so they can fit into either canon ("Legends" or Disney). I own them all but have only rea

And I would have had zero problem with that but I just don't think it matters that much. Luke does say "Snoke had already turned his heart" so I mean we do kinda get half of what you are saying there anyway. 

Although to be fair if Johnson had taken on giving some backstory to Snoke maybe it could have precluded JJ from giving us the dumb one he did. 

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TLJ ended with them calling themselves Rebels, with Luke proclaiming that the Rebellion was reborn, the Millennium Falcon roaring into the rescue, Rey stealing the Jedi books, and Leia patting the broken lightsaber and saying “we have all we need right here.” TLJ, in the end, is about connecting heavily with the past.

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It also has Rey learning her heritage and not letting it define her. It has Luke moving past his past mistakes. Like I said, its not about forgetting the past or burning the past, its about not being defined by it. 

And if you think Leia literally meant the saber was everytihng they needed I think you are nuts. She meant they have everything they need aboard the Falcon. 

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"Destroy the past" was Rian Johnson's theme.

Kylo wanted to literally erase his past. Luke was hiding from his. Rey had no past to speak of, and was being set up to create her own. Rey is the hero. When you make a movie, the theme is enacted by the hero.

Rey's desire to create her own narrative and path reflects Rian Johnson's feelings about fanboys, nostalgia, and his response to TFA hanging off the OT's jock. The goal was a NEW direction.

It's as simple as that, and everything follows this line of thinking.

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"For me, I always think that if you're cutting off the past, you're fooling yourself and you're just burying it somewhere where it's always going to come back. And the only way forward is where Rey actually lands, which is to build on the past, not necessarily to wallow in it the way that Luke is doing … with Yoda's lesson to him, with the Jedi books."

Rey must "take what's best from in it(the past) and build on it, and appreciate it, and move forward.”'

 

Both quotes from Rian Johnson

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23 hours ago, The Choc said:

It also has Rey learning her heritage and not letting it define her. It has Luke moving past his past mistakes. Like I said, its not about forgetting the past or burning the past, its about not being defined by it. 

And if you think Leia literally meant the saber was everytihng they needed I think you are nuts. She meant they have everything they need aboard the Falcon. 

It was the action. Obviously she didn’t just mean the lightsaber, but she specifically used that item as the focus. The one item in the movie that connects all the way back to the PT. She could have motioned with her hand at everything. She could have given Rey a comforting pat on the hand. Instead, she patted the lightsaber, the absolute connection with the past.

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Also, Rey isn’t defined by her parents, but she’s still doing a deep dive into the past to find her place, and finding surrogate parents. Kylo rightly calls her out on that, but it doesn’t stop her. And it shouldn’t. 

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You are taking 2 different themes and mashing them together. The theme of family isn't the same as the theme of dealing with the past. Rey doesn't want to find a new family because she can't deal with her past, its because it's a very basic human need and desire. Everyone wants to be part of a family. Everyone wants to be part of a group where they love everyone in the group and in turn everyone loves them.

It's a very common theme in all storytelling. The idea that someone with no family, or with a terrible family, seeks to create a new family and that this new makeshift family can be far better than the family they are born into. Hell look at Star Wars. You got Luke who is an orphan and then even his adoptive parents are killed. You got Leia whose family and entire homeworld is destroyed. You got a loner like Han who only cares about money. By the end of the movie they are family, they literally walk away from the X-Wing smiling with their arms around each other. Now ofcourse when Luke and Leia are revealed to be brother and sister and Han and Leia end up together they become literal family but far before that they are the family each character chooses.

Its really the same thing, Rey craves this belonging. As do Finn and Kylo. She looks for it by hoping her parents return, she puts her hope in Han, then Luke then even Kylo Ren. At the end of the movie when she is on the Falcon blowing up TIEs she exclaims "I like this" which signifies shes home, where she belongs with the family she chooses. 

But its really a separate thing from the whole how to deal with the past theme. Its such a basic building block of so many stories, especially fantasy stories, that people search and seek and long for belonging and family and they eventually find it. 

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