Jump to content

Recommended Posts

16 hours ago, Jedigoat said:

Jonesing for Shue and you keep watching Boys episodes, hoping she'll pop up?  Go watch Hollow Man or something!


What? I'm not. I only watched the one episode she's in this year. Haven't seen any of them but that one. Not going to watch any of the upcoming ones neither. Thought that was clear! Sorry!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

An aside from this series’s obvious quality and its total freshness of being yet another take on the dark and gritty hypocritical side of super heroism, Kripke recently said that superhero films are dangerous because they’re training a generation to wait for someone strong to come along to save them.
 

Apparently he missed that many of these other DC and Marvel characters, who are all really just retellings of the Hero’s Journey, are people that advocate the call to action and then answer that call to action themselves, usually when they aren’t even yet capable to do so. eg. Steve Rogers standing up for what is right even when he is a twig of a person. These are stories that propose to generations to get up and do, not sit back and watch. But anyway...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
On 10/20/2020 at 10:46 AM, Spider-Man said:

An aside from this series’s obvious quality and its total freshness of being yet another take on the dark and gritty hypocritical side of super heroism, Kripke recently said that superhero films are dangerous because they’re training a generation to wait for someone strong to come along to save them.
 

Apparently he missed that many of these other DC and Marvel characters, who are all really just retellings of the Hero’s Journey, are people that advocate the call to action and then answer that call to action themselves, usually when they aren’t even yet capable to do so. eg. Steve Rogers standing up for what is right even when he is a twig of a person. These are stories that propose to generations to get up and do, not sit back and watch. But anyway...

Yeah, the genre is certainly not a monolith. His cautionary statement seems like an oversimplification. As a matter of fact, the thing that I think makes this particular series so interesting that it dissects and explores the various facets of the genre.

*** There are light/unspecific spoilers in the rest of this post***

I think with any superhero story, part of the audience is primarily attracted to these unrelatable messiah figures, while part of the audience is attracted to these relatable protagonists of the Hero's Journey. The genius of this series is that they set it up in the first couple of seasons for you to think that the point of the series is to show you the moral superiority of those allied with the protagonist of the Hero's Journey, spending the majority of the first two seasons almost exclusively demonizing the messiah figures, and those that worship them, while only superficially criticizing (and largely celebrating) the decisions of our hero's allies. Then, at the end of season 2, they pull their bait-and-switch by revealing that not all of the protagonist's allies are exactly angels and everything the hero has been working for this whole time might actually be unwittingly aiding someone else's equally corrupt, yet equally morally-driven agenda. Making this whole show a critique on tribalism (in any form), as opposed to a critique on fascism or conservativism exclusively.  

You can foresee this as their intent based on the tie-ins the show writers make with the current political environment. They draw some pretty obvious correlations between those seeking a messiah story and the political right as well as those seeking a Hero's Journey and the political left. The morals, principles, and values that draw people to those respective political leanings also draws them to those respective superhero story types.

We'll need to see how the third season goes, but I bet that the direction that this is going is: after the big reveal, Hughie is going to start to believe that the side he takes is largely irrelevant, because there are people in both parties that are so convinced of their own moral superiority, that they are willing to do just about anything to justify their dominance over those that do not share their values. He'll be afraid that anything he does just makes him a pawn in someone else's game. I hope the writers use that Nihlistic attitude as the abyss in the longer arc of Hughie's Hero Journey though. I hope they set it up for Hughie to fall into, but ultimately reject the trappings of his Nihlism, and find a way to overcome the corrupt influences of tribalism, accepting that morality is never clear cut, always has nuance, and sometimes the moral high ground isn't occupied by one tribe for too long, if at all.

Link to post
Share on other sites
×
×
  • Create New...