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30 replies to this topic

#1
Brando

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We've had a 4K TV for about 6 months, since my daughter broke our previous TV. I just recently started getting into 4K content though, and I've been blown away. When it's done well, it's more real than reality. I watched the Karate Kid in 4K and it was a little disorienting, though. Parts were well done, parts were grainy, mainly early on.

Bumblebee and Spiderverse have been the most impressive so far.

Any one else experience any especially good (or bad) content?

#2
Darth Krawlie

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I dont even know what 4K is.

#3
The Choc

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I dont even know what 4K is.

It's basically the next level up in HD clarity over 1080P. 


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#4
Metropolis

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I think he's joking lol.

4K is a way (and a good one) to get us to buy bigger TV's. They're great for watching movies even if it's just 1080. If you have a Blu Ray player with decent up scaling the movie will look a hell of a lot better than on a 1080p set.

Batman V Superman looks amazing in 4K.
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#5
zambingo

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I have a 4K, I think its good. Certain types of vids look way better than others, not sure if that would pan out in like a study, probably just depends on the quality of the source. Food shows, for instance, seem to really benefit from the definition and color, its like you could pluck the yums right off the screen. HD screensavers of like nature scenes are breath taking too, like a magical portal, something Doctor Strange would open.

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#6
Brando

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From what I've read, the quality of the scan makes a big difference for older movies. They can either go scan the original film frame by frame or they can half-ass it. And apparently there's a problem with some stuff being called 4K but really just being 2K. Which is still great, but not the full thing. Those also tend to be the rush jobs.

For the most part I'm thinking that 4K is great for movies with great visuals or special effects, bad for movies with mediocre effects (you really see the flaws), and mostly not worth it for a lot of movies. I don't need an ultra high def version of American Pie, but Ant-Man and the Wasp looks amazing.
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#7
Odine

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I dont even know what 4K is.

It's basically the next level up in HD clarity over 1080P. 

In television resolutions maybe. In gaming 1440p has been around for ages and is arguably the "sweet spot" for resolutions

#8
El Chalupacabra

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From what I've read, the quality of the scan makes a big difference for older movies. They can either go scan the original film frame by frame or they can half-ass it. And apparently there's a problem with some stuff being called 4K but really just being 2K. Which is still great, but not the full thing. Those also tend to be the rush jobs.

For the most part I'm thinking that 4K is great for movies with great visuals or special effects, bad for movies with mediocre effects (you really see the flaws), and mostly not worth it for a lot of movies. I don't need an ultra high def version of American Pie, but Ant-Man and the Wasp looks amazing.

This. Remastering always goes back to the original.  What is weird is if you have a film from the 1940s, you can potentially get 8k out of it, but a film (or TV show) shot in the 1980s/90s may max out at 1080p, or worse!  Star Trek Voyager will never be released on Bluray or better, because the originals were scanned at an inferior quality (before HDTVs were around, really) then destroyed. 

 

Also, I always say that DVD quality is fine for me, but I will drool for hours at a Frys electronics or Best Buy, watching a dumb movie like Justice League because its in 4K.  I love how 4Ks look, but unfortunately I've turned into my Dad somehow, and will not get rid of a "perfectly fine 10 year old 1080P 42" TV," so I have to wait until this one dies, before I upgrade. 



#9
Metropolis

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I remember when an 42" widescreen tv was big. That's when the industry standard for big was a 36" tube television that weighed 300lbs.
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#10
Odine

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Projectors are the way forward

#11
Tank

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I've got a 64" 4k.

I'm not sure I see a crazy difference in quality but I also haven't made any super discerning tests.

#12
captainbleh

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Noticing the difference in quality (specifically, resolution, a good 4K screen will be better in lots of other ways and have good upscaling) will depend on viewing distance and how good your eyes are plus the quality of the content. I'm typing this on an all-in-one PC with a 27" 4K screen and the difference is obvious because my eyes are only 24" away from the screen.

 

I've got a good (or it was when it was when I bought it) 32" 1080 / 2K TV and it becomes very difficult to tell the difference between a 1080 broadcast and an 720 one from more than don't-know-the-exact-distance. A 64" 4K TV is like four of those stuck together, so the pixel density is the same.

 

Most of the viewing distance charts I've seen say that the (resolution) difference between 1080 and 4K only starts being noticeable at 8 feet / 2.4 metres for a 64" screen.

 

I haven't seen a lot of 4K content, but interested in the painstaking restorations of some 70/65 mm classics.



#13
Brando

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I've got a 64" 4k.

I'm not sure I see a crazy difference in quality but I also haven't made any super discerning tests.

I agree that there's not a crazy difference, but if someone is asking if there is a difference, the answer is yes.  Most people legitimately can't tell the difference between MP3s and physical media, and there technically is a difference.  Human ears just typically can't tell the difference.  

 

The biggest difference I've noticed is that the 4K player does a better job of upscaling than the TV, so playing a Blu-ray is visually superior.  But for most movies, I don't care.  I'm also spending most of my time in bed, so I'm watching movies on an iPad.  



#14
Tank

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I love watching things on my ipad mostly because then I won't have to wear my glasses.

#15
Metropolis

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4k was designed in part to push larger screen televisions. As good as a decent 1080p set could be, you would start to notice pixels the larger the set got. When 4k sets started to hit stores you would see 65" 1080p and 4k sets side by side running the same content. The 4k set usually blew away the 1080p set (as it should have). They don't make many 1080p sets now anyways, but you can't really find one larger than 50". Though that has more to do with costs of 4k sets coming down to the point to where it isn't cost effective for them to make 1080p sets.

#16
Metropolis

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It's been almost a couple years since we renovated our great room media wall. I designed it around our 65" 4k set. The television actually got damaged during the renovation. When shopping for a replacement my wife noticed today the newer 75" was less than what we had paid for the 65". She was all in on going bigger. What guy doesn't love his wife more when she wants a bigger TV? Problem was we were framing the old tv with natural stone tiling. When I measured for the new set, it went beyond the boundaries of the stone and wouldn't have looked as good. So we just went with another 65". We decided a few months ago to finish off the rest of the wall with the stone this summer, and come Christmas to get a 75" or larger set.
As for what Odine said about projectors bring the way to go, I used to be in that boat when I thought I would have a dedicated theater room back in the day. Unfortunately it's not cost effective, nor practical if you're using it in a room with lots of sunlight.

#17
El Chalupacabra

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I've got a 64" 4k.

I'm not sure I see a crazy difference in quality but I also haven't made any super discerning tests.

I keep saying I want to get one, but keep putting it off.  It's crazy how inexpensive they are getting.   Hell, Costco has TCL (I know, not the greatest brand, but still, 4K)  65"ers for less than $400.  Pay a little extra and you can end up with a good brand like Samsung.  Pay a little more than that, you can get OLED. 



#18
Tank

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Somebody returned a 64" Samsung 4k top of the line to best buy. It was a $5000 TV. It was available for $1500 and the problem it had was documented. After googling I saw it was a common problem caused by a faulty fiber optic cable which the warranty would replace.

So I jumped on that.
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#19
El Chalupacabra

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Awesome find!



#20
Brando

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We keep our TV in a cabinet, so we're limited in size.

But I'm quite used to things being limited in size.

#21
Metropolis

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Was at Best Buy earlier. They had a new Samsung 75" 8k set for $7000. It was running 8k demo material. It did not look any better than the other sets running 4k demos. It probably would have looked better if it were running upscaled material. That market right now would be those looking for sets 85" and up instead of a projector/screen setup.

#22
Tank

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We keep our TV in a cabinet, so we're limited in size.

But I'm quite used to things being limited in size.


So's Krawlie's wife.

#23
Ms. Spam

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Best Buy out of box specials are fantastic. Gotten some great deals on lots of things this way.


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#24
Metropolis

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We keep our TV in a cabinet, so we're limited in size.

But I'm quite used to things being limited in size.

Is the cabinet built in? The one thing I love about being able to hang your tv on the wall is that it really opens up a living space.

#25
Brando

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No, it's a freestanding thing, but we want the TV to be enclosed.  Our daughter has already destroyed two TVs, one of them in a cabinet during a brief period where the doors were open while we used the sound bar for music and a dance party.

 

I really should reorganize things and put the sound bar up on top of the cabinet so I can use it for music with the kids without fear.





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