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Netflix says the term "Chick Flick" is offensive.


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I think there are some good arguments for ditching it (and its equivalent in literature). I can't force people to ditch it, but I don't use it . Same for "actress".

 

But it's just people looking for new ways to be offended and "first world problems", obviously.

 

The knee-jerk dismissiveness here is really annoying sometimes.

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I think there are some good arguments for ditching it (and its equivalent in literature). I can't force people to ditch it, but I don't use it . Same for "actress".

 

But it's just people looking for new ways to be offended and "first world problems", obviously.

 

The knee-jerk dismissiveness here is really annoying sometimes.

So the term is an issue to you? I ask because this is not something I've heard one person ever complain about. It's not the content that is referenced because "chick flick" covers multiple genres of film. It started with romantic comedies, but has become a catchall for any movie a woman wants to see. It's the word chick. I know some women don't like the term, there are others who don't care, and there are those who are actually fond of it. Let's be honest about one thing. Chick Flick is a thing because it rhymes. The number of people who use the term with malice is probably far less than those who truly hate the term.
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Seriously Tank, with you working in film is it a term that has any negative connotations in the industry?

Not actively no.

 

But terms in Hollywood are always getting redefined. I'm more offended by "elevated horror" and "grounded scifi."

 

Not the movies that are those things (like say Hereditary or Children of Men for example) as bad, but the fact that studios, and even more so, reviewers have to justify why a genre movie becomes a crossover hit. As if the fandom genre poop couldn't possibly be good.

 

Even John Krazinski tried to push off Quiet Place as NOT a horror film.

 

I think this is a case of an exec wanting to make female driven romantic comedies without being trite and full of sociopathic behavior (like most rom coms) and decided chick flick was a lesser way to describe such a movie.

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Would you consider The Notebook a rom com?

Never saw it.

I'm also not doubting or mocking. I just don't know that I've ever experienced it. Kinda like the first time I heard people dip fries in mayo. Although after the shock I did start mocking those people.

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Seriously Tank, with you working in film is it a term that has any negative connotations in the industry?

Not actively no.

 

But terms in Hollywood are always getting redefined. I'm more offended by "elevated horror" and "grounded scifi."

 

Not the movies that are those things (like say Hereditary or Children of Men for example) as bad, but the fact that studios, and even more so, reviewers have to justify why a genre movie becomes a crossover hit. As if the fandom genre poop couldn't possibly be good.

 

Even John Krazinski tried to push off Quiet Place as NOT a horror film.

 

I think this is a case of an exec wanting to make female driven romantic comedies without being trite and full of sociopathic behavior (like most rom coms) and decided chick flick was a lesser way to describe such a movie.

See I didn't even know they went that fast in the film industry classifying films. It's sorta like music. Sub genres are broken down into more sub genres.

 

Eddie Trunk on his podcasts laments the term Hair Metal. He feels it was a way for industry execs to marginalize the bands of that era. Though Trunk does admit to the quality of music and changing tastes being the reason for it's demise.

 

I'm not sure if a term is a reason for box office success or failure of a certain film. To me bringing up the subject probably makes it a situation more than it was beforehand.

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That's a great example. So many genres get pigeonholed by one subgenre.

 

You say you like metal, and people think of The 80s and not where the genre is at now.

 

A lot of people say they hate horror films, but what they mean is, they hate slasher films from the 80s.

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