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Heavy Metal Music Is Inclusive And Governed By Rules Of Etiquette


5 replies to this topic

#1
Metropolis

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http://www.blabbermo...s-of-etiquette/

Interesting study. Can't wait to read the full thing. The only time I ever felt uncomfortable at a show was Type O/ Pantera back in '94. I'm in the pit having the time if my life when Phil Anselmo starts talking about being proud of his white heritage. Some guys yells out "**** all *******" and end my evening in the pit. So when you get these multiple stories about him saying stuff like that and him saying I have black friends, I just roll my eyes.

I've made a lot of friends just by taking about metal. At first it is usually the wow your black and listen to metal, but then the friendship evolves from other mutual interests.

#2
Odine

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Phil Anselmo is a dick. But i mean...its Pantera. A band like that couldn't be fronted by a sensitive, open minded, inclusive lefty nice guy. It just wouldn't work. The cover of vulgar display of power says it all. Phil Anselmo is a closed fist.

It does look like an interesting study, but i think the umbrella of "metal" is too broad to draw specific sociological conclusions. As if all the subcultures mix happily and everyone hangs out together as the norm. Im sure at a large festival like Wacken or Download you get all the subcultures mixing happily... Power metalers and black metalers co-existing in proximity, but that doesnt mean either group respect the others values or political beliefs, and sit down together and discuss the finer points of either sides chosen subcultural nuances. Metal is still very tribal. I think the one thing that binds these disparate groups is their common distinction from mainstream music and pop culture. But that's as far as any commonality in the real world extends.

Online is different cause you cant see who you're talking to so i think you get more cross subcultural dialogue going on and exchange of ideas. Blogs and forums are where the melting pot of ideas happen I think.

Just my two cents.

I would add a caveat that i don't really go to festivals and gigs very often anymore. I hate crowds (not because they're threatening but because people are ****s), and years of playing music hasn't been particularly kind to my ears. ( If im going to risk more hearing loss the band better be ****ing worth it.) So my perspective might be limited.

Edited by Odine, 23 September 2018 - 03:05 AM.


#3
Odine

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After thought. The "mosh pit ettiquite" thing is totally true of metal. The comraderie (sp) is strong, and I have never felt threatened at a metal show like i have at punk shows.

That said, I have never been to any war metal shows in Eastern Europe. My mate used to drum for a band called Dawn of Azazel. They played a show in the Ukraine or Czech republic and saw a guy get beaten with a spanner and a chain by a group of extremists. So you know... Everyones mileage may vary

Edited by Odine, 23 September 2018 - 03:07 AM.


#4
Metropolis

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The funny thing is when were young, if you liked more heavier versions your couldn't about to liking pop metal acts. They were posers! But you listened to them.

I always found that the people I knew that listened to black metal were nothing like the nuts that played the music. I like some black metal, but some of the guys that represent it are out there.

#5
Odine

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Yeah for sure. Extremity like that often attracts very extreme individuals as well as "regular" music fans.

#6
Iceheart

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I hope she turns her research into a documentary, that would be fascinating viewing.





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