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Your Musical Opinions!


108 replies to this topic

#76
El Chalupacabra

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Country going to a more mainstream, pop music model probably was inevitable.  I think that pretty much happened to all main genres across the board, actually.  The problem is that the same people who produce and promote Top 40 and hip hop, also do country, in that industry.  Hence why mainstream, mass produced music, across the board and regardless of genre, sounds generic.   At least that is my take.

 

And as to bluegrass, I am not a fan of it, but I do love instrumental bluegrass.  Mandolins sound beautiful.  It's the yodeling that I hate.


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#77
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I think the 90s being sort of the peak for a lot of us has to do with age, but I also think it was the last era before computers took over both distribution but also production.

The era of getting into music, going to record shops, picking up an instrument, starting a band, playing in crappy clubs and bars-- that entire culture is still there, but is no longer the only way to do it.

My musical talent is minimal, but even I can make fun darkwave tracks with the mini production system I have. I love that I can do that, but I also think that the number of undiscovered anazing rock bands playing in garages is minimal.

#78
Odine

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I mean, I can understand why people can't get down with a lot of the wider contemporary rap and hip hop... but **** there is some amazing stuff if one can be arsed looking. Like Kate Tempest: 

 

And a little older track from Death Grips, but they are still going strong. Very extreme metal/hardcore influenced hip hop (NOT IN A NU METAL WAY) 

 

 

Creative **** is out there, you just have to sift through endless amounts of homogeneity to get to the interesting.


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#79
Odine

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Okay speaking of blues and country stuff.. I was just on youtube and stumbled on this video of some dude turned his SHOVEL into an 3 string electric guitar and he shreds it

 


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#80
Brando

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The idea of spending hours to find a new band to love really appeals to me, much in the same way that winning the lottery or my office buying decent toilet paper appeals to me - things that I would love but won't happen.

#81
El Chalupacabra

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Okay speaking of blues and country stuff.. I was just on youtube and stumbled on this video of some dude turned his SHOVEL into an 3 string electric guitar and he shreds it

 

I've seen that guy before, but its awesome.  I think he actually has turned that into a business, and sells shovel guitars.  

 

 

 

Creative **** is out there, you just have to sift through endless amounts of homogeneity to get to the interesting.

 

 

The idea of spending hours to find a new band to love really appeals to me, much in the same way that winning the lottery or my office buying decent toilet paper appeals to me - things that I would love but won't happen.

Yeah, with endless ways to listen to music with automatic playlists, people have become more casual about music.  The app will sort, organize, and even learn your listening habits to select new music for you.  Being automated is convenient, but also cuts out the ability to actually seek out music and digest it, and appreciate it.  Also, see the video I posted a while back in this thread, and you get the homogeneity Odine speaks of.  It's not that music is dead, it's changed.  

 

 

I think the 90s being sort of the peak for a lot of us has to do with age, but I also think it was the last era before computers took over both distribution but also production.

The era of getting into music, going to record shops, picking up an instrument, starting a band, playing in crappy clubs and bars-- that entire culture is still there, but is no longer the only way to do it.

My musical talent is minimal, but even I can make fun darkwave tracks with the mini production system I have. I love that I can do that, but I also think that the number of undiscovered anazing rock bands playing in garages is minimal.

Yeah, totally.  Millennials and younger probably overall think the music I listen to is geezer rock, and the stuff they listen to is great.  Opinion based and subjective for sure.  However, I think there is something is lost when a musician who can carry a passable (but not great) tune is selected more because of a look, ability to dance, and being willing to take choreography to create music in a corperate lab somewhere, than sheer talent of playing a guitar, drums, keyboard, or being a superior singer.  I wouldn't say I have talent and can play guitar well.  I just end up making noise for a half hour several times a week that annoys the cat.  I can't play well (I admit it, I suck), but I can play enough to appreciate how difficult being truly great at guitar is.  


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#82
Metropolis

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The idea of spending hours to find a new band to love really appeals to me, much in the same way that winning the lottery or my office buying decent toilet paper appeals to me - things that I would love but won't happen.

That's what record stores were for. The guys running them could usually give you advice on what was something I'd probably like, or even hey check this out it's different but give it a try. As easy as it is to go searching now a days I'm just to lazy for it.
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#83
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I have spent all my life saying I hate country music, but I finally realized I don't. What I hate is the 90s forward Top 40 version of country. Garth Brooks, Travis Tritt, and all those other jackholes in giant button up shirts and cowboy hats singing about pick-up trucks and line dancing ruined a legit cultural music genre.

Old school country was blues southern rock or some evolution of cowboy music.

I've been listening to a lot of alt country / southern gothic bands lately like Neko Case, Cat Power, Handsome Family, Jim White, and Brown Bird.

 

 

I just came back from Michigan's oldest traditional music festival and can confirm. I heard "chamber music" (the Americana kind, not the classical kind), ragtime, traditional bluegrass, contemporary bluegrass, honky-tonk, blues, Cajun, traditional Irish, traditional Mexican, alt-country, singer-songwriter, you name it. And exactly one act who sounded like she should be on top 40 country except she's a she and writes actually good, thoughtful music  :lol:  :cry:

 

What's really funny is that Darrell Scott was one of the headliners. Chances are, he's written or co-written any random song you can name that's been on top 40 country radio for the past 20+ years, especially the ones back in the dreaded 90's. But when he sings them, just him and his guitar? Completely different sound. They're actually great songs. It's so sad what the top 40 sound does to good bones.



#84
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And as to bluegrass, I am not a fan of it, but I do love instrumental bluegrass.  Mandolins sound beautiful.  It's the yodeling that I hate.

 

 

Yodelling is a part of bluegrass for sure, but it's becoming a lost art, it can be done well and wonderfully or badly and painfully, and it's not absolutely needed for a bluegrass vocal. I didn't hear a single yodel this past weekend.



#85
El Chalupacabra

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And as to bluegrass, I am not a fan of it, but I do love instrumental bluegrass.  Mandolins sound beautiful.  It's the yodeling that I hate.

 

 

Yodelling is a part of bluegrass for sure, but it's becoming a lost art, it can be done well and wonderfully or badly and painfully, and it's not absolutely needed for a bluegrass vocal. I didn't hear a single yodel this past weekend.

 

I have yet to hear a yodel that doesn't make me want to jam ice picks into my ears!



#86
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The best yodels I've heard are from artists who have spent a significant amount of time in Appalachia studying under elders and experts. Said artists use yodeling very sparingly.

 

I think there's a fair few bands that are just like "yodeling is easy!" and just start doing it when... it's really, really not easy if you want to do it well, and they end up doing it terribly.

 

Much like bagpipes.



#87
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I feel that way about bagpipes. People tell me that its possible for bagpipes to be played beautifully, but I've never heard a single bagpipe that didn't make me want to jump in front of a bus.

#88
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You need to go to Scotland (preferably the highlands) and hear a piper play by a castle ruin, or a loch, with a soft drizzle coming down and mist/low cloud shrouding the mountains in eerie splendor. Then you will understand the bagpipes. Itll send shivers down your spine.
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#89
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I'm pretty certain that it'd give me a migraine regardless. Unless I was far enough away that I could barely hear it.

#90
Iceheart

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Don't ever go to a renaissance faire.



#91
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I think I'm pretty safe, but thanks.

#92
Ms. Spam

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It's been pretty popular at funerals too. But I like bagpipes. I wanted to play one in marching band but my band director said no, there's not a football field anywhere he'd put me playing bagpipes. I think he agreed with you, Fozzie. 



#93
Iceheart

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You should have brought out your bagpipes at halftime anyway.



#94
Metropolis

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You know what grinds my gears? They haven't figured out a way for mp3s to transition from one connected song to the next without that pause. CDs were like this at first, but they fixed it.
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#95
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COSIGNED.

 

That, or artists need to stop connecting their songs together on albums. It really does me in when there's clearly supposed to be a seamless transition and then DEAD SPACE.



#96
Metropolis

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It's worse when I'm under a set of headphones rocking to a song.

#97
Odine

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Umm.. I listen to digital music and the songs never have that noticeable pause in between tracks. But I use  .aac files not mp3 so maybe that's it?



#98
Metropolis

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Well I listen to music room my Google play account. Not sure what form they use, I just said mp3 as a generic term. The break isn't long, but it's noticable.

#99
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Yeah dunno. I mostly listen to albums from start to finish, and so tracks flow on to one and other as they would on a record. And i have compared albums that i own both digitally and in LP format. It is a bummer when that gap is noticeable.

#100
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Edited



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