Jump to content

Welcome to Nightly.Net
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Post election thoughts and possible future trends


102 replies to this topic

#26
Marc DuQuesne

Marc DuQuesne

    Member

  • Members
  • 592 posts

http://katu.com/news...gton-with-idaho

 

Let's not forget, parts of Oregon and Washington have been talking about joining a real state for a while now.



#27
pavonis

pavonis

    Member

  • Member
  • 6,905 posts
Why is Idaho a "real" state? I've been there. It was scenic but otherwise depressing.

#28
Ms. Spam

Ms. Spam

    MS.

  • Member
  • 17,882 posts

I live in Texas.  :cool:



#29
Metropolis

Metropolis

    Member

  • Member
  • 14,933 posts
I wish these SJWs on college campuses could have their professors actually "fact check" them once in a while. But that'll never happen since they're the hippies putting these ideas in their heads to begin with.

If I see another Impeach Trump sign I might poke my eyes out. You cannot impeach a President Elect! And why? On what grounds? Because Trump isn't who you voted for? You sound like Seinfeld wanting to return a coat out of spite. "I'm sorry. But you already said spite." That's what you'd hear at the House hearings.

#30
Poe Dameron

Poe Dameron

    Member

  • Member
  • 2,485 posts

Truth be told, Congress could theoretically impeach and remove Trump on charges of "I Don't Like Your Face" and he'd be removed if half the House and 2/3 of the Senate went along with it.  It's not like there's an appeals process.  Not that they want to set a precedent like that.

 

Personally, I think there's a strong case to be made there that the use of oblique threats of using of violence to intimidate his political opponents by Trump and his campaign rises to the level of "high crimes and misdemeanors".  Though, for strictly political (not legal) reasons, it is unthinkable to impeach Trump as of yet.

 

It is definitely on the table though if he steps out of line.  At the moment, Republicans are falling into step behind him though.  Congressional Republicans have received an unexpected gift.  They control Congress and they have a president who doesn't have much of an agenda of his own.  Suddenly Congress has gained power back simply by virtue of their having stockpiling eight years' worth of ideas, having the power to pass a lot of it, and facing something of a vacuum in the Executive Branch.

 

Congress just went from irrelevant in the Obama Administration, to critical to the success of the Trump Administration.  They kinda like that.



#31
Marc DuQuesne

Marc DuQuesne

    Member

  • Members
  • 592 posts

Why is Idaho a "real" state? I've been there. It was scenic but otherwise depressing.

The thing that makes Idaho a real state to me is that we are totally different. I get depressed when I have to share air with thousands of other people. I can't tune out the noise of a city and I hate sirens and horns. I am happiest sitting on top of a mountain alone or with someone who doesn't feel the need to fill time with small talk. 

 

I am not saying that anything is wrong with where you live, but city folk always seem to think that the rural people are the ones that can't make it in the city, that we didn't choose to live here and simply got left behind by all the cool people. We don't see you as the cool people. We see what looks like a whole lot of group-think sheep-like behavior. 



#32
Marc DuQuesne

Marc DuQuesne

    Member

  • Members
  • 592 posts

Here is an example, I have never seen an adult playing Pokemon Go in Idaho. I have however heard relentless mocking on the subject.



#33
Darth Krawlie

Darth Krawlie

    privileged ****lord

  • Moderators
  • 34,900 posts
So it's a real state because you like it. That's all.

#34
Marc DuQuesne

Marc DuQuesne

    Member

  • Members
  • 592 posts

Yes. That is all.

 

The biggest global future trend I see post election is that China is going to fill the void of the TPP with its 'One Belt, One Road' initiative. They are done playing second fiddle.



#35
Metropolis

Metropolis

    Member

  • Member
  • 14,933 posts
Well Poe I was kinda referring to the fact that you can only impeach a sitting president. Trump's not that until January.

In theory yes they can begin the impeachment process once he gets in office, but the precedent does not favor actual impeachment. The FBI wouldn't bring Hillary up on charges because they didn't feel there was a chance they could get a conviction.
  • Ms. Spam +1 this

#36
pavonis

pavonis

    Member

  • Member
  • 6,905 posts


Why is Idaho a "real" state? I've been there. It was scenic but otherwise depressing.


The thing that makes Idaho a real state to me is that we are totally different. I get depressed when I have to share air with thousands of other people. I can't tune out the noise of a city and I hate sirens and horns. I am happiest sitting on top of a mountain alone or with someone who doesn't feel the need to fill time with small talk. 
 
I am not saying that anything is wrong with where you live, but city folk always seem to think that the rural people are the ones that can't make it in the city, that we didn't choose to live here and simply got left behind by all the cool people. We don't see you as the cool people. We see what looks like a whole lot of group-think sheep-like behavior. 
Yes, totally different except for being identical to Montana, the Dakotas, Wyoming, etc. The rural folk live in cultural bubbles, too, surrounded by group-think and literal sheep. Their only exposure to the world is through Hollywood.

This rural-urban divide is as old as the US. But the rural citizens seem to think they alone inhabit the "real America". Rural folks need the city folks, you just don't like admitting it.

Just to facilitate a greater understanding, when urban dwellers hear country people talk about "real America", it sounds like code for "white, Christian America" because that's what most rural citizens are. "Quiet" and "peaceful" are not the first things that come to mind about the rural regions and their inhabitants. More like boring and stubborn.

#37
Ms. Spam

Ms. Spam

    MS.

  • Member
  • 17,882 posts

That's why the Electoral College was made. So that those flyover states would have just as much voice as say New York state. Or at least that's my understanding of the rules.



#38
pavonis

pavonis

    Member

  • Member
  • 6,905 posts
Sure, except that now the flyover states get disproportionate representation. If that were my priority I'd move to Wyoming. Our representation in government is not mathematically fair in any way. It can't be.

#39
Ms. Spam

Ms. Spam

    MS.

  • Member
  • 17,882 posts

That's why a lot of people and some papers are reporting that you should move to a fly over state if you are a democrat. But, eh. I like visiting those states. With a GOP controlled Congress we won't see a change to the electoral college any time soon.



#40
pavonis

pavonis

    Member

  • Member
  • 6,905 posts
But flyover states are full of small towns with nothing to do.

I considered moving to a small town recently, because of a job offer. I visited, and the entire town was centered on Main Street. The only thing to do was hang out in the grocery store's coffee shop. The mall was dead. The town had no restaurants or any entertainment venues. It was boring.

#41
Ms. Spam

Ms. Spam

    MS.

  • Member
  • 17,882 posts

Someone made this interesting graphic:

 

15042216_10154820158138013_9326260687982

 

I think it takes a certain personality to live in smaller areas. Manifest Destiny was not done by people who are "city slickers" but people who wanted opportunity and a vast empty wasteland with little or no interference of the law. I could expound but I'm very lazy on a Saturday morning and not sure why I brought up the US's drive west.



#42
Poe Dameron

Poe Dameron

    Member

  • Member
  • 2,485 posts

Sure, except that now the flyover states get disproportionate representation. If that were my priority I'd move to Wyoming. Our representation in government is not mathematically fair in any way. It can't be.

Are you under the false impression that it's supposed to be?  The Constitutional Convention balanced the needs of big states and small states all over the place.  The most notable compromise was the bicameral legislature where the House of Representatives was based on population and the Senate on equal representation per state.

 

The electoral college gives a small advantage to less populace states as a similar compromise.  It's not as big as the Senate obviously, but it just as disproportionately advantageous to small states at the beginning of the Republic.  And, frankly, I really don't have a problem with it.

 

Look, Democrats were perfectly happy with the electoral college for the past eight years.  Yet another thing they happily rubbed Republican noses in to show them how utterly helpless they were against them.  They had their "blue wall" which they thought gave them a huge advantage in close races.  And, truth be told, it did.  If Democrats win any of the swing states of Florida, Ohio, and N. Carolina, they can almost call it an election.  Especially with Virginia becoming more blue every year.

 

This time, it didn't work.  Trump found votes in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and (most surprisingly), Michigan.  The structural advantage Democrats had in the electoral college collapsed and now the system is totally unfair again like it was right after Bush won.



#43
pavonis

pavonis

    Member

  • Member
  • 6,905 posts
No, Poe, I'm not under the false impression that the system is supposed to be fair. I'm not even for the abolishment of the electoral college. I'm just commenting on the mathematical analyses of representation systems of government. There's no "fair" system from an objective, mathematical viewpoint. It's neither a condemnation nor a promotion of the current system, just an observation.

And Spam, pioneers pushed west to settle new lands, and promptly built new cities in the wilderness. Where else would the humble farmer sell his products?
  • Ms. Spam +1 this

#44
Poe Dameron

Poe Dameron

    Member

  • Member
  • 2,485 posts

That's why a lot of people and some papers are reporting that you should move to a fly over state if you are a democrat.

 

That's nothing new.  Democrats have been fleeing their high tax/high cost of living states into red states for the last half-century.



#45
pavonis

pavonis

    Member

  • Member
  • 6,905 posts
Citation?
  • Ms. Spam +1 this

#46
Ms. Spam

Ms. Spam

    MS.

  • Member
  • 17,882 posts

Uh... if that were true this conversation would be moot.

 

People who move to smaller rural areas are Branch Davidians, meth cookers, off the gridders, members of the aryan nation and fringe nuts like the ones that took over that wildlife refuge in Oregon. The ones that vote or recognize the US as their country are GOP right now. I think the ones who are Democrat living in the flyover states live in urban areas or they maintain a second home for vacationing. A small number are probably scientists or cultural hippies who've probably given up the commune.



#47
Poe Dameron

Poe Dameron

    Member

  • Member
  • 2,485 posts

C'mon, I know people have issues with people making unsubstantiated claims, but do I really need to pull up a citation that the northeast and rust belt have grown slower than states in the sun belt that are mostly red?

 

Here's the 2010 US census and the 1960 electoral college map vs. today's.  You can just take a look at the comparison of growth between expensive northeast and rust belt states vs. red states, or states that used to be red like Virginia.  Plus, more recently, people leaving California, which was a red state 50 years ago (only went Democrat once between 1948-1992), for Arizona, Nevada, and Colorado now that liberals own it.



#48
pavonis

pavonis

    Member

  • Member
  • 6,905 posts
Numbers are our friends. Data is always a good thing to have.
  • Lucas1138 +1 this

#49
Driver

Driver

    Tank

  • Supporters
  • 6,591 posts
I have a lot of rural living family that I love-- and I hate generalizations, but there's a reason we're having this conversation. All of us have experienced going into the countryside, even here in liberalland Cali, and suddenly feel like we're in Tennessee 1958.

Whether it's blatant racism, sexism, poorly educated attitudes-- there's almost always a fear of the thing that's different.

Since the internet the world has gotten smaller, and I think rural youth is proving to be more blue than red, but the hit the city limits and enter a red state phenomena has always confused me.

#50
Marc DuQuesne

Marc DuQuesne

    Member

  • Members
  • 592 posts

I have a lot of rural living family that I love-- and I hate generalizations, but there's a reason we're having this conversation. All of us have experienced going into the countryside, even here in liberalland Cali, and suddenly feel like we're in Tennessee 1958.

Whether it's blatant racism, sexism, poorly educated attitudes-- there's almost always a fear of the thing that's different.

Since the internet the world has gotten smaller, and I think rural youth is proving to be more blue than red, but the hit the city limits and enter a red state phenomena has always confused me.

And we out here in the sticks all have that experience of the stuck up Californians that come out here and treat us like idiot peasants. I once watched some rich snooty bitch go on for about 30 seconds berating a teller at the grocery store about the stupid hicks inhabiting these parts that can't even count. Then I told her impolitely the teller's father was a nuclear engineer.





Reply to this topic