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Where Do You Stand on Brexit?


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Diversity is way overrated. One of those comforting and happy kind of words that liberals like to curl up with at night while they pretend the world is a "civilized" place. It is obvious at face value that putting Black Panthers and the KKK into close proximity would be a really stupid idea, yet that is what the rule book calls for in order to "educate" both sides. Then they are terribly surprised when that "education" includes bloodshed. Then they blame all the people who can't get past what is in fact human nature and common sense, distrust that which is different from yourself.

 

I like learning about different cultures and the way people live in different places. Then I like to go home and live like "my" people do. If this stupid diversity crap goes much further I won't be able to. I will just be going to another place just exactly like where I came from. It will all be the same culture. Dictated from above.

 

Some cultures don't mix well together. Mass immigration is a bigger issue to most people than seems to be the case on this message board. It has certainly ruined this election cycle in the US. When cultures are melded slowly together and integrate they can reach a common ground. In other words, I totally agree with pretty much everything Poe said and I am down for a 4 way.

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Lose £'s overnight with this one trick the EU doesn't want you to know about! Economists hate him!

At some point politicians really should take note that massive amounts of immigration is bad if, for no other reason, how destabilizing it is. I mean, Kyrian's pointing to his not finding any study t

Wow, OK, not even sure how to address this. First off, it's demonstrable that immigration has no negative effect on the economy; the only way it's seen as a bad thing is in things where the clash of c

I fully understand and mostly agree with the arguments in favor of diversity. You just have to look at the whole picture.

 

Last year the company I worked for was involved in a large project and we brought in a bunch of people from out of state. My employer provided housing for those people and the permanent employees who lived out of town.

 

One of the guys was black so the boss, knowing I don't care what color a person is, asked if I wanted to share a condo with him. I, a conservative leaning married with children white atheist from county of less than 3000 people (over 99% Caucasian), lived with a religious liberal leaning single black guy from New Jersey for about four months.

 

He was the best roommate I have ever had and I look at that experience as one of the more enlightening and educational of my life. He was well traveled and well learned and had a ton of life experience. We discussed every topic from politics to religion to philosophy.

 

One evening after we got to know each other a bit and were discussing race relations he made the statement that he could count the people he had met here who were not racist on one hand. I immediately went to the defensive, but after he explained that he was talking about passive rather than active racism I could see his point. While there was very little outright obvious racism (though I personally witnessed enough to thoroughly embarrass me) people would only deal with him on a professional level. They didn't make conversation with him and generally acted uncomfortable around him. He told me that he was uncomfortable every day and would not have come had he known what to expect. He said that while he experienced far more active racism in New Jersey he felt far less welcome here and would not recommend any black person come out to Idaho without having family or friends here.

 

Diversity worked out great for me in this case, not so much for him.

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I fully understand and mostly agree with the arguments in favor of diversity. You just have to look at the whole picture.

Last year the company I worked for was involved in a large project and we brought in a bunch of people from out of state. My employer provided housing for those people and the permanent employees who lived out of town.

One of the guys was black so the boss, knowing I don't care what color a person is, asked if I wanted to share a condo with him. I, a conservative leaning married with children white atheist from county of less than 3000 people (over 99% Caucasian), lived with a religious liberal leaning single black guy from New Jersey for about four months.

He was the best roommate I have ever had and I look at that experience as one of the more enlightening and educational of my life. He was well traveled and well learned and had a ton of life experience. We discussed every topic from politics to religion to philosophy.

One evening after we got to know each other a bit and were discussing race relations he made the statement that he could count the people he had met here who were not racist on one hand. I immediately went to the defensive, but after he explained that he was talking about passive rather than active racism I could see his point. While there was very little outright obvious racism (though I personally witnessed enough to thoroughly embarrass me) people would only deal with him on a professional level. They didn't make conversation with him and generally acted uncomfortable around him. He told me that he was uncomfortable every day and would not have come had he known what to expect. He said that while he experienced far more active racism in New Jersey he felt far less welcome here and would not recommend any black person come out to Idaho without having family or friends here.

Diversity worked out great for me in this case, not so much for him.

The flip side to that is white people coming down south and finding out how racist black people can be. Buddy of mine from New Jersey used to goof on rednecks and how bad they were to blacks, then he got a job in a warehouse where he was the only white guy. He was cool to all of them but they treated him like shit. He did the best he could but they hated having a white guy in the workplace. It was so bad he had to quit.

 

The there was the girl from Pittsburgh. She got a head teaching job over a bunch of black teachers, and they did everything they could to intimidate and undermine her. Called her every name in the book. She hung in there but she had to deal with a lot of racist belly aching bullshit to make it work.

 

So yeah. The diversity thing goes both ways.

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Totally. I worked in Chattanooga for a couple weeks and spent some time in Atlanta, Orlando, and Valdosta. Chattanooga wasn't too bad actually, we went down to the local eateries and had a great time. There were some people that tried to goof on us a bit, but it gets hard to goof on a couple dozen construction workers (wherever they're from) so it all stayed pretty tame and mostly civil.

 

We must have got a reputation pretty quick though. After we were there a couple days there were about a half dozen "Vietnam Vets" that would hit us up for cash, beer and cigarettes at our hotel every night. I thought at least two of them looked way to young to be vets, but they were both missing a leg so we always shared a beer with them and listened to their wildly unlikely stories. I'm sure they giggled to themselves about the gullible hicks from Idaho at the same time we giggled about them.

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Necro-bump.

 

I'd like to congratulate May for making such a grand hash out of all of this. I know the EU was playing hardball (which oddly justifies the arguments of both the remainers and the leavers), but she handled this just about as poorly as she could. At times I was wondering why the British Prime Minister was the official representative of the EU in Parliament. Why would she sign a document that would freeze further negotiations that she had to know would never pass, and more than that, should not have passed? What were they thinking by not at least putting someone in charge who believed in Brexit?

 

Ah well, simple lesson for the future. Keep multinational unions at an arm's distance.

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It was an ill-advised, poorly thought out, political gamble all thanks to the human ham-sandwich David Cameron. It has degenerated into an absolute cluster f*ck of incompetence, political opportunism and backstabbing. Disgraceful.

Edited by Odine
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