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Maybe it doesn't help the situation for you.

 

I've worked plenty of customer service jobs, and I still know people who work in chat/telephone support jobs, and for most people (including myself), when somebody can remain calm and say something along the lines of "I am very frustrated right now, but it is the situation, not you. What is the next step we need to take to move forward?" it really helps diffuse the situation. At least in my case, it would reduce the level of ****tiness in my day while guaranteeing I'd do everything I can to help the person, so it's a win-win (and I could resolve most situations, 'cause I had a good relationship with the shipping/tracking department, and could get a hold of just about anything). I think most people in customer service, even if they dislike their jobs, still want to help people who will be reasonable and work with them. It's rewarding in its way. But if somebody just starts tearing me a new ***hole from the start of the conversation, I'm not lifting a finger beyond the bare minimum to help: it's just an automatic escalation and an additional 5-10 minute wait on hold before the supervisor comes back from smoke break.

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The one issue I have is that frequently people don't take into account that there are people who aren't capable of benefiting from any level of training/education.   When I was 16, I worked a fast foo

Yeah, when I need help over the phone and I am in a hurry, the last thing I need is a f*cking choose your own touch tone adventure.

Can't recall the numbers, but I think it's something like 40% of adults getting money from the government with only 60% paying taxes. That's a problem. Time to bring back the bubonic plague, because

I think there's a massive difference between yelling "It's not you, it's the situation" and telling someone you're not satisfied with what they can do for you. In this case, the person was unwilling to elevate it and claimed they couldn't, so I took it out on the follow up survey and said that the person claimed to have done everything she could, so I was dissatisfied with the company, not the employee.

 

If they want to call her out after the fact for being unwilling to elevate, that's on them. I am really annoyed that a lot of customer service people do not want to offer to elevate when it's clear it's needed. But I have a feeling that may come down to their work culture (elevations frowned upon by the supervisor, because they expect their employees to deal with it/actually don't want to do any work themselves).

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Oh yeah, I agree with that. If you tell somebody you need something and they can't help to your satisfaction, they need to send you to somebody who can (or at least somebody with more authority who can try to explain to you why it can't be done).

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