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Fantastic Four reboot


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I'd bet anything that the FF will be like Punisher and Ghost Rider and it will quietly return to Marvel. spider-man is too iconic to not go big with. marvel's plans are so worked out for years I don't see room for a FF movie. They'd fight for the X-Men, but not the FF.

 

Meanwhile, Fox could easily put all their money into the x-men. There's enough characters and sub groups to build their own universe with.

They should fight for the FF. If a Marvel movie even moved within 30% of the best FF print stories, they would end up with the greatest superhero or any fantasy film ever made. That's how strong the FF was at its height, and frankly, few superhero movies are even a whisper of that.

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See that is part of the problem. Putting grit and Fantastic Four together is like describing Superman as a murderer. Wait. Well, ****...

ive never said this to anybody before brett but your bowel movements sound amazing

Which is the stupidest excuse ever. People kinda forget that Sue was 19, and Johnny 16 when FF #1 came out in 1962. Reed is 6 years older than Sue (they first met when he was 19 and working for her da

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Apparently Fox wants to reboot X-Men as a high profile TV series, but the TV rights to the characters are more easily contestable than the film ones. (Hence Marvel using X-Men in animated series). I'd bet dollars to donuts that they'll give Marvel the FF and cosmic characters in exchange for X-Men on TV.

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I'd bet anything that the FF will be like Punisher and Ghost Rider and it will quietly return to Marvel. spider-man is too iconic to not go big with. marvel's plans are so worked out for years I don't see room for a FF movie. They'd fight for the X-Men, but not the FF.

 

Meanwhile, Fox could easily put all their money into the x-men. There's enough characters and sub groups to build their own universe with.

They should fight for the FF. If a Marvel movie even moved within 30% of the best FF print stories, they would end up with the greatest superhero or any fantasy film ever made. That's how strong the FF was at its height, and frankly, few superhero movies are even a whisper of that.

There was a time when the FF was Marvel's flagship title, but even they can't keep interest in th FF going. They've been relaunched and cancelled over and over in the last 15 years. The era you're talking about is great to read as a sample of that era, but none of those stories would translate to the modern day. I know you hate all things new, it's a truth that everyone struggles with.

 

Fox, like any other studio, thinks to make it current they have to make it dark, which is silly. In print Marvel has tried several approaches, none of which really clicked. That's not to say it can't be done, but the core ideals of the original story, for whatever reason, don't seem to catch with modern audiences.

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That's what I'd do. They've retroactively filled in several eras of the MCU that tell us that despite SHIELD going public in Iron Man 1, they've always been around. Agent Carter in the 40s, Hank Pym in the 80s... Why not give us the 60s.

 

The thing people forget is that the FF was a commentary on how the 50s nuclear family went into the literal nuclear age in the cold war.

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I don't know if it needs a ton of humor. What Incredibles did was do a Cold War spy movie, with superhero action and a dysfunctional family story at its heart. But I agree it will be hard to top.

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Assuming Marvel gets the rights back, if they don't go with a 60s era approach, it would be interesting to see them go for the Future Foundation (possibly/likely after having some of the characters show up in other movies first). It would allow them to avoid having to use the possibly tarnished-beyond-repair (for the moment, anyway) Fantastic Four title. Setting them up as older characters teaching their own children and others opens up some interesting stories that the other Marvel movies aren't necessarily covering and allows them to easily sidestep an origin movie while giving them easy opportunities to discuss their origin in the form of the kids.

 

It would also fit with Marvel molding much of the MCU off of relatively recent story arcs.

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I'd bet anything that the FF will be like Punisher and Ghost Rider and it will quietly return to Marvel. spider-man is too iconic to not go big with. marvel's plans are so worked out for years I don't see room for a FF movie. They'd fight for the X-Men, but not the FF.

 

Meanwhile, Fox could easily put all their money into the x-men. There's enough characters and sub groups to build their own universe with.

They should fight for the FF. If a Marvel movie even moved within 30% of the best FF print stories, they would end up with the greatest superhero or any fantasy film ever made. That's how strong the FF was at its height, and frankly, few superhero movies are even a whisper of that.

There was a time when the FF was Marvel's flagship title, but even they can't keep interest in th FF going. They've been relaunched and cancelled over and over in the last 15 years. The era you're talking about is great to read as a sample of that era, but none of those stories would translate to the modern day. I know you hate all things new, it's a truth that everyone struggles with.

 

Fox, like any other studio, thinks to make it current they have to make it dark, which is silly. In print Marvel has tried several approaches, none of which really clicked. That's not to say it can't be done, but the core ideals of the original story, for whatever reason, don't seem to catch with modern audiences.

 

No, I do not hate all things new in the way you hate all things old (see how that worked? :) ), but any story can be translated to the modern day. How many old books that were very much a product of their decade-or in some cases, century--found updated success on screen over the decades? Especially fantasy stories? Superman the Movie, Raimi's Spider-Man, Captain America - The First Avenger and other films all dealt with stories published for generations (and their culture) that were/are long gone, but each easily found big screen success.

 

I do not see the FF as being a greater challenge. If--as you say--the story does not catch with present day audience, blame that on wrongheaded or inferior filmmakers, not the basic concept. The De Laurentis Flash Gordon was a perfect example of the wrong people screwing up what could have been a spectacular film--even coming in on the heels of (at that time) two Star Wars films.

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Thr would be a change from every Iron Man/Avengers movie being:

Tony is a jerk

Bad things happen

Tony learns to care about others

Yeah, i'm surprised the audience has not soured on RD's performance. There's no real growth in the bigger picture.

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I'd bet anything that the FF will be like Punisher and Ghost Rider and it will quietly return to Marvel. spider-man is too iconic to not go big with. marvel's plans are so worked out for years I don't see room for a FF movie. They'd fight for the X-Men, but not the FF.

 

Meanwhile, Fox could easily put all their money into the x-men. There's enough characters and sub groups to build their own universe with.

They should fight for the FF. If a Marvel movie even moved within 30% of the best FF print stories, they would end up with the greatest superhero or any fantasy film ever made. That's how strong the FF was at its height, and frankly, few superhero movies are even a whisper of that.

There was a time when the FF was Marvel's flagship title, but even they can't keep interest in th FF going. They've been relaunched and cancelled over and over in the last 15 years. The era you're talking about is great to read as a sample of that era, but none of those stories would translate to the modern day. I know you hate all things new, it's a truth that everyone struggles with.

 

Fox, like any other studio, thinks to make it current they have to make it dark, which is silly. In print Marvel has tried several approaches, none of which really clicked. That's not to say it can't be done, but the core ideals of the original story, for whatever reason, don't seem to catch with modern audiences.

 

No, I do not hate all things new in the way you hate all things old (see how that worked? :) ), but any story can be translated to the modern day. How many old books that were very much a product of their decade-or in some cases, century--found updated success on screen over the decades? Especially fantasy stories? Superman the Movie, Raimi's Spider-Man, Captain America - The First Avenger and other films all dealt with stories published for generations (and their culture) that were/are long gone, but each easily found big screen success.

 

I do not see the FF as being a greater challenge. If--as you say--the story does not catch with present day audience, blame that on wrongheaded or inferior filmmakers, not the basic concept. The De Laurentis Flash Gordon was a perfect example of the wrong people screwing up what could have been a spectacular film--even coming in on the heels of (at that time) two Star Wars films.

 

What's an old school FF arc you think could make it? I am admittedly nowhere near s versed with them as say the X-Men. But most of the classic FF stories I recall are outlier scifi alien stories or super-science vs monsters. Or Namor's Sue-boner ruining their day.

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Maybe liking the book for 20 years before the movie colored my judgement but I loved it. Its true to the book (which is offbeat) and while it has a few flaws it tells the story set forth in the book.

 

I'm not militant about it because its not a franchise I live and die with but I think enough people had made up their minds to hate it before it premiered that it became vogue to do so.

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Probably, but it also was bad without the cheesy charm of Independence Day or the decades of goodwill of TPM. Instead it basically came across as a big budget version of a Kirk Cameron film.

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