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How does your garden grow?

gardening vegetables fruits flowers

139 replies to this topic

#76
Cerina

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Yes. I will make a point of doing so today. Of both the hydrangea and the squash.

#77
monkeygirl

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k, the closer the shot, the better. Tell us what the soil's like, too.

#78
Cerina

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I've given up on the squash. I think it died. :( Maybe next year.

Here's my hydrangea. 3-4 weeks ago it had a ton of big bright pink blooms.

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These are my annuals. I don't even know what they are. I just thought they were pretty.
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The ones on the outside were all different (see below for a pic of the still living ones, though all the blooms fell off) but all of a sudden all the bushy white things on the left side (closest to the hydrangea actually) just died!! The pink and purple things are still kicking but a lot of those blooms turned brown as well.

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As far as I can tell, the soil's fine. You dig down a few inches and it's still moist. The philodendron and jasmine we planted on the other side of the same bed are both doing well. The jasmine isn't blooming anymore either, but it's grown quite a bit. The philodendron looks happy as ****.

#79
Ms. Spam

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Not so much my garden but this a Russian Thistle.
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I love these things.

#80
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My Entrance:
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The Gerbera Daisies are no longer coming up but my snaps are blooming.

#81
Chalcedony

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These are my annuals. I don't even know what they are. I just thought they were pretty.


I think those are called...pinks, maybe?


Not so much my garden but this a Russian Thistle.


These grow wild in some parts of Prescott, AZ. Well, technically not "wild" but "feral," since they were introduced and are considered an invasive weed, but they're so beautiful that I can't imagine anyone objecting to them. The bees seem to love them, and they brighten up the roadsides.

#82
Ms. Spam

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Cerina! I think they're getting not enough water. Stupid Texas for the heat on flowers. You have lots of new growth but it's limping down. or maybe it needs deadheading.
The pinks are what I have in my flower pots. They're Dianthus. They're supposed to have a really good scent as well.

By my air conditioner I have something called Desert Rose. It only blooms in the morning and then it twists itself back up to bloom again the next day.On the other side of my steps up I have mexican heather, jasmine and a tomato plant with another hardy Texas plant, Salvia greggi.

Chalc, I love those things. I think they are beautiful no matter what state of growth they are in.

#83
Cerina

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Part of it may be water. This pic was taken before their afternoon watering. Typically they get watered every day.

I just don't understand the browning and deadness. :(

#84
Ms. Spam

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That's what I said about my fern. I lasted almost six months but it died.

#85
monkeygirl

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You have to do some deep watering for your climate, I'm guessing, but almost surely this is lack of water, especially the hydrangea. Your new growth leaves are droopy and I can't see any discoloration on the underside of the leaves to indicate a pest problem. You may not be watering enough in volume or often enough or at the right times. Best time is morning, near sunrise. At night, water can attract bugs, during the day it can just evaporate. I'd give them a damn fine soaking one morning, in addition to regular watering, and see how they respond in 24-36 hours.

#86
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Nutrients can't be understated. Give'em some food with their water, miracle grow and dried blood, but not too much. once a month or every six weeks is a nice boost with that combo. Then again I grow veggies and succulents, flowers are probably different.


As for me, well I've just been chillin.... and my babies are just babies. All those herbs are the woman's. The tomatoes (there are 13 in this pic) peppers (five) and del fuoco beans (coming up on the twine) are mine. more pics to come, and probably more plants since the bitch nazi neighbor has not yet put one plant in the ground after all her yapping and I'm about to Operation Barbarosa her side. You can see her crappy black tarp in the pic.

Also, totally heard "Montego Bay" today at the thrift store and thought of Tami.

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#87
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Also, had to put this one up... so cute! My turtle loves the sage bush too, he'll burrow right under it while I weed.

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#88
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I love both pictures for the boots and hte rabbits!

#89
monkeygirl

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Nutrients are needed but reese's pics don't show lack of nutrients-that browning and drooping isn't indicative.

I use a diluted Miracle Gro on almost everything at least once a week, sometimes every other time I water. I assume the manufacturer suggests a little more product per use than is necessary, so I use a bit less. I also use specific food for the plants once a month in a high dose formula...fish slag on most, rhody and camelia food on natives and slow-release spikes on the trees and big bushes.

Reese, talk to some people at nurseries about your area's problems and watering schedules. I'm guessing it's very difficult to over-water where you are unless the soil is compact.

#90
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I could do that. What confuses me most is the fact that all my annuals are in a 3'x2' area, all in the same soil and only half of them just up and died. Some are less than 8" from each other!! But ONLY ONE LIVES!! I don't get it.

We're very close to the coast. It rains here in Houston a lot more than other parts of Texas.

#91
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Did you transplant them? That can shock some them and the weak ones often don't recover, or at least not very well.

#92
Cerina

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They went from the nursery into the ground probably back in February. Haven't done much with them since, just watered and added mulch. For the most part they were all doing really well. They all tripled in size and produced tons of blooms.

This was them back in March.
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#93
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Heat can do it sometimes. I have luck with some things and others not so much. I wish I could grow ferns.

#94
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Yeah, seems like heat and lack of water. MG's got the best advice in this thrad. Believe her.

#95
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Cerina,
I do think it's a water or soil/nutrient issue. The annuals in the center are dianthus, and they're pretty drought-tolerant. The ones on the edges that died look to me like lobelia, and lobelia are notorious (k, at least with me) for keeling over the second they feel a pinch of thirst. As pretty as they are, I won't buy them any more because they always die on me. Plus, hydrangea are well known to need extra water for the first couple years of life...can't tell you the times I thought I'd killed mine, only to see them come back after a good soaking.

That said, the only other thing it might be would be an insect that is sucking water/sap out of the plant stems, like thrips and aphids. Both would be visible, if they're still around, on the underside of leaves or along the stems...and both kill plants and make blooms and leaves wilt or turn brown, similar to drought. They can be killed by spraying them with insecticidal soap.

And I know you're supposed to water in the morning -- but I never get up that early. So I give mine a good soaking about 7 pm when it's hot, so that the leaves will dry by dark but they'll have the whole cool night to soak up some water before it gets hot again.

Also - LOVE LOVE LOVE that giant thistle. Very cool. I know it's a weed but I'd love to have one. I do grow Globe Thistles right now. This isn't my pic (I don't know how to post things here any more without a host site, which I don't have) but it'll do:
Aren't they fun?

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#96
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Yeah, I never thought about that, you can probably water later than I can because it'll evaporate on the surface before dark where you are. Cripes, I can't water past 4pm here, even now-everything'll still be damp and aphidy by morning. But as Lace says, if it's dry on the surface by dark, you're likely OK.

My monitor's not crisp enough-I thought ALL of that was Dianthus-yeah, Lace, Lobelia does the same for me-it's sooo ****ing dainty. Hydrangeas aren't very sun and heat tolerant, either. Another guess, Resse: you planted in the late winter, the plants got all comfy in a temperate climate, then it warmed up a bit and your soil may have had pockets of air in it-you likely have sandier soil than I do, too- and it dried below the surface and some of it settled, leaving the roots temporarily out of touch with good loam. Watering deeply will help that, too. I'd train a soaker hose or sprinkler on the area for about 45 minutes or an hour and see what happens. What exposure is that last pic? Which direction does that side of your house face? Suggestion: plant something there that'll get about 3 feet high with heavy fragrance-it's so close to your windows, you could make that room smell like a garden just by opening the windows! Jasmine is pretty hardy and smelly.

AND ALSO: thumbs up for the globe thistle!

all my annuals are in a 3'x2' area, all in the same soil and only half of them just up and died. Some are less than 8" from each other!! But ONLY ONE LIVES!! I don't get it.

Welcome to the joy of gardening! :) There IS no answer.
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#97
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It's been so cold and rainy here I have literally watered twice since I put them in the ground May 13 :(

#98
Cerina

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The hydrangea only gets morning sun. By about 1 or 2pm it's in the shade. We had a very mild winter this year. It was in the high 70s/low 80s through most of Feb and Mar.

I have no idea what I planted. They were pretty and on sale. So I bought them. :shrug: WHY IN GOD'S NAME WOULD A NURSERY IN HOUSTON SELL NON-DROUGHT AND HEAT RESISTANT PLANTS?!?! Stupid nursery...

I'll have my husband water the hell out of the hydrangea in the AM for a week or so and we'll see what happens. The leaves are all perky again though. :shrug:

#99
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WHY IN GOD'S NAME WOULD A NURSERY IN HOUSTON SELL NON-DROUGHT AND HEAT RESISTANT PLANTS?!?! Stupid nursery...


OH DON'T GET ME STARTED.

Seriously, they do it for 2 reasons: many providers (Monrovia, Proven Winners) are national so they have a huge catalog. AND because serious gardeners don't like native plants usually (you know, those that grow naturally and thrive in your own region?). We get bored with them quickly, EVERYBODY has them (Well, DUH! They're suited for your neighorhood and sometimes maintenence-free) and we like an exotic challenge. My Mom's in the Tampa/St. Pete area and she longs to grow petunias and maidenhair ferns and I'm like GOOD GAWD KILL ME NOW! WHY grow something so pedestrian!? I have them as filler plants. I want to grow Lantana, palms and bananas and she says "weeds? you want to grow WEEDS?"

I've said it before-pay attention to the tags, but find out if the tags are inserted by the growers or the nursery. Growers can use universal tags that may have info not suitable for your area. F'risntance, any national tag that says "partial sun OK" means 'plant ONLY in full, blazing, midday sun' here 'cause we don't get much hot sun, even on hot days, because of how far north we are. A "full deep shade" tag here can mean full morning sun is fine. You'll also get used to kind of knowing what a plant can take just by looking at it. The bigger and fuller the leaves, usually means the better it'll do in shade and part sun. Fine greens and dainty stems can take a LOT more sun.

AND ALSO, you have micro-climates, depending on your home and structures-little spots that are more sunny/dry/wind-free or shady, damp and windy than the rest of your gardens. Once you know where they are, you can get your exotic plant jones on that way. I have ONE spot in all our gardens that bananas LOVE. I've not been able to grow them elsewhere, not even 2 feet away and I don't know why. It's the sun for sure, but it doesn't get any afternoon rays and it's totally exposed-so I'd have never thought it'd be a micro-climate, but it is, It's all a happy accident.

So, which direction does that garden face, reese?

#100
Cerina

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Mostly NNE. The side where the hydrangea is faces NNE to E. The other side is NNE-NNW.



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