Jump to content

The Phantom Menace • Virtual DVD Commentary


Recommended Posts

In introducing my son to Star Wars, I watched Phantom Menace for the first time in easily 5 or 6 years. A few things struck me-- it wasn't quite as bad as recalled, and it felt more "Star Wars" then I've been admitting to for a decade now. That said, I do still think it is a movie full of some bad ideas, poor execution and sloppy film making. I have been bashing this movie for so long with general call backs and half-memories, and I'd like to hone that film-snob angst.

 

I've often said I love the story of PT, but I hate the execution. When my son was watching it I was half-paying attention. So, I had the idea to watch the film again, without distraction, and to take it scene by scene and try to piece together exactly where and how it goes off the rails for me. It's almost like a DVD commentary/review hybrid, so I thought it would be fun to do it for everyone to follow along.

 

To make it interesting, I've asked Thomas Alan (Son of Lucas to you old timers) to go through the same process at the same time with me. Thomas is my perfect foil as we are of similar age, we were raised on the same genre entertainment, we're politically opposite and we've both been here about the same amount of time. Thomas created one of my favorite threads-- the EXPLAIN ANY AND EVERY INCONSISTENCY IN THE PT EVER thread. Some would call him a PT apologist, but for him, the films worked.

 

What we're going to do here, is every few days we'll post commentary for a handful of scenes. We're going to post our bits simultaneously. This isn't to say you all can't join in and/or follow along, it's just that knowing the nature of this site (and how Thomas and I interact) I worry about getting derailed once the posts start to pile up. This is meant to be more of a opposing views situation, instead of a point/counter point. So one of us will post the commentary, we'll all comment, then move on to the next set of scenes.

 

Look for the first commentary by the end of the week!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 221
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I see what you're doing.

He was using the force to fly the damn thing whilst trying to stop it falling apart.   Noobs.

And here we go!

 

Opening Scroll

 

Episode I

The Phantom Menace

 

Turmoil has engulfed the Galactic Republic. The taxation of trade routes to outlying star systems is in dispute.

 

Hoping the resolve the matter with a blockade of deadly battleships, the greedy Trade Federation has stopped all shipping to the small planet of Naboo.

 

While the Congress of the Republic endlessly debates this alarming chain of events, the Supreme Chancellor has secretly dispatched two Jedi Knights, the guardians of peace and justice in the galaxy, to settle the conflict...

 

-Much has been made over the years as to how the opening of TPM is merely a bunch of boring legalese while the scrolls of the Original Trilogy spoke of rebellions and secret planet destroying superweapons.

 

-In this I think both the critics and Lucas missed the mark. TPM is a time of relative peace. The Old Republic is rotting from within, but, the Naboo conflict aside, it is essentially the calm before the storm. In that sense it's really a standalone movie depicting the Golden Age which was lost than it is a part of a trilogy. The idea that an opening scroll for a galaxy that has been at peace longer than Yoda's been alive (which we all knew coming in) was going to lack the fireworks of the other scrolls. It's a theme which I believe the detractors missed a great many times in their criticism.

 

-Where Lucas went wrong was in attempting to fabricate a crisis. It's surprising since he remembered what the movie was about in the title. There is a Phantom Menace out there pulling the strings, causing relatively minor issues to lay the seeds for the oppressive Empire we'll be seeing in later films. The New Republic was obviously in no great turmoil at the beginning of the movie and there should never have been an attempt to claim so. Following up a claim of turmoil with a taxation dispute was weak and just asking for trouble, and, worse, tramples on the theme of Rome on the verge of collapse without anyone noticing.

 

-A proper opening scroll would started with a declaration of a time of peace being disturbed by those pesky Trade Federation opportunists who are now blockading poor Naboo. But don't you worry, because the Chancellor has dispatched two of the legendary supermen Jedi to resolve the conflict post-haste. But in the shadows...

 

-Lucas would have still been accused of providing a boring start, but at least he wouldn't have lowered himself to pretending that the tax code is on par with the Death Star.

 

I've never been a fan of the TPM scroll. To be fair, I was never a fan of ROTJs scroll either. ANH and ESB have this cadence to them that helps set-up the backstory and more importantly the MacGuffin/mission, which are crucial to Star Wars films in my opinion.

 

ANH tells us about the civil war and the Death Star plans and Darth Vader and the Princess and the spaceship and CUE EXPLOSIONS. ESB was all about Vader wanting Luke (for what!? Who knows!? Exciting!) and the rebellion struggling to use the Death Star victory to gain momentum--but guess what, Vader won't let them.

 

The TPM crawl reads like a news brief that doesn't really spell out any excitement. The Old Republic is mention, and that's cool... but first time impressions: "who's Naboo? Who's the Trade Federation? Why should I care? It's not a grand statement about rebels fighting the Empire. Granted those factions don't exist yet, but I feel like the crawl generally establishes key plot points, and here they are (as Obi-wan says very soon) elusive. If this were a news brief, there is a very important factor missing: the WHY.

 

Why is Naboo being blockaded? Now granted, first time seeing this I could cut the crawl slack. It's not THAT big of an idea, but it filled me with questions off the bat, and they were questions that went unanswered. Does this movie suck 30 seconds in? No, not at all. Like I said, ROTJ had a lackluster crawl as well. The first time I read the TPM crawl it didn't excite me, and while that isn't a crime or a portent of doom, it was a missed opportunity.

 

Sequence 1: Arrival of the Jedi

 

The Jedi arrive at the blockade and are granted permission to dock at the Trade federation flagship. TC-14 leads Jedi Qui-Gon and young Obi-Wan to a meeting room to wait for the Nemoidians to arrive. Obi-Wan senses an allusive danger, but is advised by Qui-Gon to keep his focus on the mission in front of them. Qui-Gon believes the Trade Federation will fold quickly.

 

-Some FX shots of ships and droids to start the movie, and they hold up much better than the Special Edition ships we saw only two years earlier. I always thought the droid fighters walking around with the rest of the crew was a pretty nifty idea too, even if I never could figure out why it would be necessary.

 

-Right off the bat we get two interesting voices coming from the Jedi shuttle captain and the Nemoidian. I've got a thing for chicks with scratchy voices so I naturally approve of using her. The Nemoidians got some flack for their voices too, but the fact that we get two so early should tell us that it was a goal of the movie to vary the voices so that the audience would receive different cadences (we'll see this again with the Gungans, Watto, and secondary characters such as the race announcer). I suspect we have Ben Burtt to thank for the constant change-ups, which I mostly approve of.

 

-A droid model similar to C-3PO shows up to give some immediate continuity with the previous movies, while playing with our heads a bit by giving it a female voice (but similar mannerisms).

 

-"I have a bad feeling about this". A simultaneous bit of continuity and fanservice, as well as an attempt to famous phrase out of the way.

 

-Obi-Wan states here that Yoda was one of his teachers. We'll see in the next movie that he teaches all the young Jedi students. Just to toot my own horn, it was my theory early post-TPM that Yoda did exactly that. This knowledge should have stopped the continuity detractors from complaining, but oddly they still state that this is some sort of error to this day.

 

-Qui-Gon speaks of the Living Force, which, according to the source material, is in dichotomy with the Unifying Force. Qui-Gon's reliance on the Living Force marks him as a bit of a free lancer in comparison with the more conservative followers of the Unifying Force (including Obi-Wan). Of course there's no way the average audience member could know this without at least reading the novelization.

 

-This is the first (and barely remembered) attempt of the movie to expand our understanding of the Force and what Jedi had studied and knew about it. We’ll also learn about midichlorians later. In future movies the Force largely reverts back to the amorphous will of the galaxy we knew from the Original Trilogy.

 

-I always wondered if this was a case of Lucas backing off of original plans for this stuff or there just being a bunch of superfluous ideas that found their way into the first Prequel, but time (or listening to criticism) kept the stray ideas out of the next few movies.

 

-Qui-Gon predicts a quick end to the problem now that they are on scene. The first instance of the theme of Jedi arrogance.

 

 

Red spaceship = cool. I feel like saying something as I flies by... it's just a cool ship. It's clearly a cousin to the Blockade Runner, so it's a fun call back. But it's got that Star Wars look, albeit a little cleaner--but given when this film is happening, that's cool.

 

The Nemoidians. With the weird voices. This particular bit is brief enough that you just sort of roll with it, but it immediately I found it odd. My first impression, just based on "As you know, our blockade is perfectly legal" is one of curiosity. I like that he sounds alien, the prosthetic/mask work is great, the pronunciation doesn't bother me as much as the cadence. But you know--he is an alien. Iâ'll come back to this in scenes when they talk again.

 

The girl 3P0 is amusing, and I have always liked the entrance of the Jedi with the hoods up. They're mysterious and have an air of both nobility and power about them. It immediately reminds me of Luke's intro in ROTJ when he shows up at Jabba's confident and in control of his power. Even as a kid I could see how far Luke had come. Knowing this is the golden age of the Jedi, I'm immediately cued to the fact that these two Jedi are badass.

 

When the hoods drop and we meet Obi-wan and Qui-Gom we get the famous running line "I've got a bad feeling about this" which is cool, but then it stumbles into Qui-Gon talking about the living force. It's difficult to talk about things when I know what's coming, but at the time, seeing this scene for the first time I wasn't bothered. It as interesting that Qui-gon had some sort of different take on the force than what we've heard so far. While this is technically the first Star Wars film, it is actually the fourth, and I was very wary about changing the rules four films into an established set up. But, and this is key, at the time I assumed it was a set-up for a pay off.

 

The exchange between the Jedi has three little beats: one, Obi-wan mentions Yoda; two, Obi-wan senses a darker force at work, while Qui-gon does not; and three, Qui-gon says the Federation is cowardly.

 

I'd like to say I went into TPM completely blind, but I didn't. I know the Yoda line is fan service to acknowledge the set-up from ESB that Yoda trained Obi-Wan, but at the same time, Qui-Gon is really his mentor here. It's explained, and it doesn't violate continuity--but when ghostie Ben says "Yoda--the Jedi master who instructed me" it felt like the sort of mentor role we say Yoda Take with Luke, that clearly Qui-Gon has with Obi-wan.

 

The Federation being cowardly line backs up the "greedy" descriptor in the crawl, confirming that yes, these are the bad guys

 

Foresight: Obi-wan knows something is else is out there. This struck me as interesting that Obi-wan was hip to something Qui-gon was not. The fact that Qui-gon goes into his living force malarkey makes me think that it IS malarkey since the name of the damn movie is the PHANTOM MENACE and we all know that the one-day-to-be Emperor is out there someplace.

 

Sequence 2: Consulting Lord Sidious

 

The Nemoidians learn that the ambassadors are Jedi Knights and promptly wet themselves. TC-14 is sent back to distract the Jedi. Lord Sidious is contacted and he gives the order land troops on Naboo and assassinate the Jedi.

 

-This sequence is essentially a few minutes of exposition to set up the action sequence to follow. It also introduces Lord Sidious as the puppet-master of the crisis.

 

-TC-14 brings the Jedi tea and a large, smooth metal shaft on a tray. Presumably this is a foolproof method for distracting Jedi.

 

-Qui-Gon declares the trade dispute trivial. This pretty much refutes the Opening Scroll's contention that the whole galaxy is in turmoil over it. At least the movie itself is getting things right in regards to the severity of the situation.

 

-Sidious's use of "stunted slime" as an insult fits with the rather weak name-calling of the Original Trilogy (old-fossil, overweight glob of grease, scruffy-looking nerf herder), but probably wasn't the best way to introduce the scary big bad of the movie.

 

-The Nemoidians are scared when they find out that there are Jedi on board. They fatalistically predict their own destruction several times even after their attack on the Jedi begins. Yet they follow Sidious's commands without hesitation. A much more effective way of demonstrating the big bad's power.

 

I always loved how the Nemoidians go into panic mode over the fact there are Jedi. Once again, we get an idea of the power, respect and even fear surrounding them. "They're here to force a settlement" clues in that they do have some sort of legal power, but it also confuses me a bit as to how exactly this galaxy works. It seems like the TF is a company, where as the Naboo are a society.

 

As has been implied, the TF reveals they are operating on orders from somebody else, the titular Phantom Menace- Darth Sidious, who old fans know instantly to be the yet-to-be-crowned Emperor. The exchange is shades of ESB where Sidious is comfortable sitting in the wings making others do his dirty work. The thing about this scene that disappointed me, and it’s not a huge deal, is that he's introduced so blase-- a behind shot of a fizzly hologram. When we first saw him in ESB he was giant freaking head that cinema's most recognized villain was bowing to. I guess I wanted a similar introduction here. While he may not have the political power he has in ESB, he is still the root of evil and I wanted to see that the TF were actually more afraid of him then they are of the Jedi.

 

It's at this point that the Nemoidian speech starts to bother me. Not in a PC, making fun of Japanese people way(that criticism came later and while I understand it, it didn't occur to me when I first saw the film.) It's hard to ignore once it's been brought up-- but mostly, both on first impression and now, I find it jarring. It’s the cadence more than the word pronunciation. It's jarring and clunky and I think it is hard to follow. In the OT all aliens save for Admiral Ackbar spoke in their own languages, and everyone just understood each other. When it was needed, it was subtitled (unless you're Chewbacca). There's probably too much dialog with these guys to subtitle, but that voice has become annoying 10 minutes into the film.

 

I know it's early, but in general I'm struggling to get exactly what is going on. The crawl says the galaxy is in turmoil, but the blockade is apparently legal. The Jedi have been dispatched in secret to negotiate, and have the legal authority, but Sidious sees this as some sort of protocol breach on the part of the Chancellor. It's HIS plan, and the TF is rolling with it. I'm not a slow person, and I don't demand plot points be fed to me as fast as possible--but Star Wars has a style, and it's that Macguffin/mission set up. In ANH, it's the death star plans that drive the action. In ESB, it's Vader trying to find Luke. In ROTJ, it's Luke taking down the Empire. Every scene and plot point in each of those films is locked into those narrative thrusts. Star Wars is fast, visual and mythic. So I'm not an idiot and impatient for the mystery to be revealed, but at this point, even 10-15 minutes in, I really feel like we should know what's going on, and we don't. I mean I can figure it out, but I feel like I shouldn't have to because it's Star Wars! Why is Naboo blockaded specifically? What does the Trade Federation get out of this? IS it a big deal or not? If this is normal for Jedi business, why is it a secret they are here? I don't think it's bad to have these questions now, although it seems clunky.

 

Sequence 3: Jedi Ambush

 

The Nemoidians attempt to kill the Jedi via gassing. When that fails the Jedi head towards the bridge destroying a small army of droids along the way, but are finally repelled by more powerful droidekas. While running, the Jedi come across the invasion army which will soon depart for Naboo. They decide to stow away with the invasion and head for the surface.

 

-So long sexy voice captain. You have the distinction of being the first (well, and that other guy) casualty of the Star Wars.

 

-Don't care what anyone says. I like the battledroid's clueless little chatter.

 

-A neat way to reintroduce lightsabers through the fog. It gives the weapons a bit of life of their own.

 

-Here's where we're put on notice. In this Trilogy, Jedi will cut loose. We saw a bit of it in Return of the Jedi where Luke flashed his lightsaber a bit more frequently against people during the rescue sequence at Jabba's, but otherwise that trilogy hardly ever showed lightsabers being used unless it was against Sith/Jedi, snow monsters, or bar drunks. It's one of those things that lets us know we're seeing an age of Jedi where they flash their weapons easily and often.

 

-Another cool little image where Qui-Gon melts the door with his lightsaber. It's a bit unfortunate they never really went back to that image again except for collateral damage effects.

 

-You must wonder why they didn't send their most deadly droids down to take care of the Jedi in the first place.

 

-The Jedi have super-speed apparently (for a moment anyway). Another cool(?) little thing that was never again revisited. It also makes them semi-translucent.

 

-Super speed feels like it's in the same vein as the Force stuff. Little additions like that make me lean more towards the idea that Lucas just had too many ideas because of the length of the production. It's like a pilot for a television show that technically has a lot more stuff added to it, but which is different and somehow inferior from the rest of the series. Without the same budget and time, all the cool stuff and ambition from the pilot is forgotten in favor of a more streamlined approach which is easier to produce and which the audience feels more comfortable.

 

-And here we have an army. Of course we already knew the Trade Federation planned to invade. Perhaps it would have been wise to hold off on that information earlier and just have Sidious tell them to move up their plans. A small correction though.

 

-I do wonder how they're going to warn anybody about an invasion when they'll technically be a part of the invasion. Eh well.

 

Let's kill the Jedi! Blow their ride and gass 'em! I love the quick-draw sabers. I think that was a cheer moment in the theater. The battle droids make interesting foes-- but I wish they'd looked like IG-88 for some fun continuity.

 

The first lightsaber action of the PT is pretty cool and flashy. It's like Luke on the sail barge times 100.

 

Again, seeing that the TF guys were more scared of Sidious would have helped here, because they are scared of the Jedi. Their panic is great, and Qui-gon making short work of their door is cool. I know people say his hands would have been burned--but it looks cool. I was waiting for Nute or Dofine or whatever the scared TF guy was called to go into some sort of 'Nam flashback about Jedi laying the smackdown.

 

The destroyers/droidekas/wheel droids are fun with their shields, but it prompts the Jedi so super-ran down the hall which was both cool and confusing. We can't assume that just because Luke didn't do it, it doesn't exist--so I went in expecting to see some cool Jedi action. And really, it's not so out of line with Luke's repeated use of the super-force jump. But it begs the question--if Jedi can move superfast like that, why don't they ever do it again?

 

The shot of Obi-wan and Qui-gon jumping out of the ventilation shafts is probably the first (sadly not last) time I feel like CGI shouldn't have been used. It's a quick shot, but it looks off. The weight of those tiny computer jedi seems like a video game.

 

"You were right!" A little glib line, perfectly in line with the humor of Star Wars. Qui-gon preceeds this with more politico speak that makes me again question the balance of power and who wants what. Is Naboo important or not?

Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW-- this isn't a read only sort of thing. We're posting at the same time so as to not derail ourselves, feel free to agree/disagree comment or making statements of you're own. I only ask that once we move onto the next section, we MOVE ON. If need be i can move out any discussions that seem to derail to a new thread.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I didn't realize this had been posted already :)

 

Well, for the first few minutes of the movie it looks like Tank and I are hitting on a lot of the same general thoughts. Interesting that I was disappointed in Sidious introduction based on what it was (insult beneath the dignity of the big bad), while Tank was disappointed based on what it wasn't (giant head).

 

Tank is a bit more confused about what was going on than I was. Granted he has some reason given that there are some contradictory statements between the Opening Scroll, the movie, and our utter lack of knowledge as to what part of this blockade is legal, but in broad terms I think the idea is simple enough. Naboo's being blockaded, the Jedi are sent to negotiate a settlement "or else" (the or else being the basis for their legal and negotiating authority), and Sidious is worried that a couple of Jedi are going to gunk up the works and possibly make his allies go soft-kneed. Otherwise, we can sort of roll with the Macguffin.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you read the book before watching the movie, Thomas? (Sidenote: I think it's the best of the movie novelizations, and I actually quite enjoyed it moreso than the movie!)

 

I do remember kinda being clueless as to what was going on, as well. What the hell is Naboo? What's the Trade Federation? I wasn't sure if it was because I practically had the OT memorized and knew almost every nuance and was in unfamiliar territory for the first time in a long time, or if because it was simply a lot of new information without enough backstory.

 

Tank, I think Sidious's introduction was appropriate. He's working in shadows, so a big ol' hologram is powerful, but not nearly as sneaky.

 

Great insights by both of you! You've picked up on little things I never thought of or noticed.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Did you read the book before watching the movie, Thomas? (Sidenote: I think it's the best of the movie novelizations, and I actually quite enjoyed it moreso than the movie!)

No, I knew next to nothing about all the Prequels before seeing them in theaters. You're right about it being better than the other novelizations, which were both putrid.

Link to post
Share on other sites

- Thoughts on John Williams' score thusly. The Main Title (or Luke's theme) is great as always, though it's pretty much going through the motions. I think that the theme should have featured more prominently in the PT as the theme for Anakin before his fall, as it was the theme for Luke in the OT. The various appearances of the original theme are a bit puzzling. Yeah, it's the Star Wars theme and you have to have it, but what the hell. There is an eerie, suspenseful mood as they arrive at the ship and the Emperor's theme from ROTJ is reprised (or, rather, it makes its first appearance?) during Palpatine's hologram. The music when the Jedi fight the droids is great. This is the first moment to really catch your attention. The theme for the Force (or Ben's theme) is spine-tingling as Qui-Gon cuts through the door.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Another point about Ben's line in ESB. He couldn't actually tell Luke to go and visit Qui Gon cause he's dead! I've never understood why this is a continuity issue! Also, does Qui Gon have the rank of Master seeing as he's not on the council? So he couldn't be the Jedi MASTER who instructed him right?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Tank is a bit more confused about what was going on than I was. Granted he has some reason given that there are some contradictory statements between the Opening Scroll, the movie, and our utter lack of knowledge as to what part of this blockade is legal, but in broad terms I think the idea is simple enough. Naboo's being blockaded, the Jedi are sent to negotiate a settlement "or else" (the or else being the basis for their legal and negotiating authority), and Sidious is worried that a couple of Jedi are going to gunk up the works and possibly make his allies go soft-kneed. Otherwise, we can sort of roll with the Macguffin.

 

In theory you're right. the movies aren't quite complex enough to worry about it too much. Star Wars has always been what-you-see-is-what-you-get. but to this day I couldn't tell you what was so important about Naboo or what the TF was getting out of the deal. Story wise, i get that it's the situation Palpy/Sid needs o get himself elected-- but what line is the TF being sold? Why does the galaxy give a crap about Naboo.

 

Tank, I think Sidious's introduction was appropriate. He's working in shadows, so a big ol' hologram is powerful, but not nearly as sneaky.

 

But I wanted him to SPOOOOOOKY.

 

- Thoughts on John Williams' score thusly. The Main Title (or Luke's theme) is great as always, though it's pretty much going through the motions. I think that the theme should have featured more prominently in the PT as the theme for Anakin before his fall, as it was the theme for Luke in the OT. The various appearances of the original theme are a bit puzzling. Yeah, it's the Star Wars theme and you have to have it, but what the hell. There is an eerie, suspenseful mood as they arrive at the ship and the Emperor's theme from ROTJ is reprised (or, rather, it makes its first appearance?) during Palpatine's hologram. The music when the Jedi fight the droids is great. This is the first moment to really catch your attention. The theme for the Force (or Ben's theme) is spine-tingling as Qui-Gon cuts through the door.

 

I didn't mention the music at all! I think up to this point most of the major bits were pretty much recycled. So it didn't stick out to me.

 

 

Another point about Ben's line in ESB. He couldn't actually tell Luke to go and visit Qui Gon cause he's dead! I've never understood why this is a continuity issue! Also, does Qui Gon have the rank of Master seeing as he's not on the council? So he couldn't be the Jedi MASTER who instructed him right?

 

It doesn't violate continuity so much as it violates the spirit of what we've always known.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Tank is a bit more confused about what was going on than I was. Granted he has some reason given that there are some contradictory statements between the Opening Scroll, the movie, and our utter lack of knowledge as to what part of this blockade is legal, but in broad terms I think the idea is simple enough. Naboo's being blockaded, the Jedi are sent to negotiate a settlement "or else" (the or else being the basis for their legal and negotiating authority), and Sidious is worried that a couple of Jedi are going to gunk up the works and possibly make his allies go soft-kneed. Otherwise, we can sort of roll with the Macguffin.

 

In theory you're right. the movies aren't quite complex enough to worry about it too much. Star Wars has always been what-you-see-is-what-you-get. but to this day I couldn't tell you what was so important about Naboo or what the TF was getting out of the deal. Story wise, i get that it's the situation Palpy/Sid needs o get himself elected-- but what line is the TF being sold? Why does the galaxy give a crap about Naboo.

 

Tank, I think Sidious's introduction was appropriate. He's working in shadows, so a big ol' hologram is powerful, but not nearly as sneaky.

 

But I wanted him to SPOOOOOOKY.

 

- Thoughts on John Williams' score thusly. The Main Title (or Luke's theme) is great as always, though it's pretty much going through the motions. I think that the theme should have featured more prominently in the PT as the theme for Anakin before his fall, as it was the theme for Luke in the OT. The various appearances of the original theme are a bit puzzling. Yeah, it's the Star Wars theme and you have to have it, but what the hell. There is an eerie, suspenseful mood as they arrive at the ship and the Emperor's theme from ROTJ is reprised (or, rather, it makes its first appearance?) during Palpatine's hologram. The music when the Jedi fight the droids is great. This is the first moment to really catch your attention. The theme for the Force (or Ben's theme) is spine-tingling as Qui-Gon cuts through the door.

 

I didn't mention the music at all! I think up to this point most of the major bits were pretty much recycled. So it didn't stick out to me.

 

 

Another point about Ben's line in ESB. He couldn't actually tell Luke to go and visit Qui Gon cause he's dead! I've never understood why this is a continuity issue! Also, does Qui Gon have the rank of Master seeing as he's not on the council? So he couldn't be the Jedi MASTER who instructed him right?

 

It doesn't violate continuity so much as it violates the spirit of what we've always known.

 

 

 

Yoda was the only Jedi Master alive in ESB who instructed Kenobi.

Link to post
Share on other sites
but what line is the TF being sold?

 

As soon as Sidious tells the Viceroy that they must accelerate their plans, this immediately becomes less of an issue to me.

 

Assuming this is the same man who was Vaders masters (shame on some of you conspiracy theorists), you know right out of the chute that we're dealing with A) a powerful and persuasive individual, and B) cowards (as already stated by Qui-Gon himself) at the disposal of Sidious. I find this all very acceptable at this point. If this guy can convince Anakin Skywalker to help hunt down and destroy his fellow Jedi, then surely he can convince a cowardly bunch of greedy aliens to do his bidding.

 

Why does the galaxy give a crap about Naboo.

 

The blockade on Naboo is meant to serve as an example of how the Trade Federation plans to accept the taxation of their trade routes, and is a direct expression against the entire Republic (and all of its systems). I'd say that for the galaxy to care about Naboo is to respond to the Trade Federations lack of acceptance of the taxation of their trade routes with disapproval. The galaxy presumably voted to pass such legislation, and now the Trade Federation is scoffing at this. A lack of response from the "galactic community" here sets a precedent largely in favor of future Trade Federation blockades, so there has to be a response against this blockade to maintain the integrity of the legislation that allows the taxation and the integrity of those who passed it.

 

Short version...

 

The planet _____ (fill in the blank): They are blockading that planet! What if this happens to us?!? OMG!

 

The Senate: You're blockading one of our planets? Scoffing at our legislation? This is unacceptable!

 

If for no other reason, it's moreso enforcing rules and regulations on the Trade Federation than it is looking out for the Naboo - though if you look a little deeper at what their line of thought probably is as the Senates collective delegates and those who run it, you HAVE to care about what's happening here.

 

But slinking back to the short version, this was more or less my line of thinking back in 1999. It worked for me.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a great answer-- but my point of playing a little bit dumb was that you had to connect those dots solo. I'm sure you're on the money, and that's what i assume the case to be as well, but we never get any real evidence of that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres my insightful commentary for the film to this point:

 

Qui-Gon melting the blastdoor was awesome!!!11!

 

Ahem, but seriously thats one of my favourite moments, perfect combination of visuals and music. Carry on guys, good job so far, look forward to the rest.

Link to post
Share on other sites
It doesn't violate continuity so much as it violates the spirit of what we've always known.

 

I appreciate your standpoint. However what puzzles me above all on this issue is that some people are happy to accept that Yoda instructed Obi Wan and therefore do not see any continuity problems and others say it's a plot hole and use it as another lever to wedge the two trilogies further apart. Even if you take Ben's line at it's literal meaning it still rings true. But seeing as the OT gave little insight into Ben's origins I can understand why some people would put their money on it. No other information to go off is there!

Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...