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Revolution Revelations: RED STEEL site launch - Another exclusive ,Nibris's SADNESS


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#51
A Munkeys Uncle

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Maybe the system supports the GC, N 64, and SNES controllers :confused:

#52
The Shadow

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Jaded Jedi posted this at the bottom of the previous page just carrying it over so folks get a chance to see it.

http://cube.ign.com/...1/651559p1.html

Understanding the Revolution Controller

quote:



Understanding the Revolution Controller
If you use two pointers, can four people still play? How will Revolution handle more conventional games? We've got the facts.
by Matt Casamassina

September 16, 2005 - Nintendo's Revolution controller has set the videogame industry abuzz with excitement and in some cases confusion. One glance around popular community message boards proves that gamers are both blown away by the possibilities and simultaneously scratching their collective head about how the peripheral might interact with more traditional software. The device is so dramatically different from the accepted norm that we'd be surprised if readers weren't thrown for an initial double-take. But once the details about the new controller sink in, it's not difficult to see the gameplay possibilities lurking just beyond the horizon.

We've combed over all the controller details and put together a handy list of facts about the peripheral that, we believe, will help clear up any misconceptions about what it does and doesn't do. As readers will see below, the Revolution's input mechanism is thoroughly flexible and preemptively ready for any type of gameplay challenge.

Q: What exactly is so special about the Revolution controller?

A: The Revolution controller may look like a stylish television remote, but there's a lot more to the device than its glossy exterior suggests. The remote-like peripheral, which has been called the "free-hand style controller" and "pointer" by Nintendo, interacts with two motion sensors placed on the left and right sides of a user's television. The marriage transforms the pointer into a virtual wand of sorts, enabling users to move objects and characters in games simply by moving the peripheral. The sensors read the pointer's every move in real-time space. They can detect up, down, left and right motion, and also translate forward and backward depth. The controller's sensors also recognize twisting, rotating and tilting movements. In short, any motion made by arms and wrists can be translated to Revolution games.

The free-hand-style unit also comes standard with three gameplay-specific face buttons, three menu-specific buttons, a D-Pad and an underbelly trigger. In addition, the unit's bottom shell can be removed, revealing a slot for expansion peripherals. Nintendo has several add-ons planned, some of which we'll detail below. The pointer is completely wireless and features built-in force feedback. Gamers can rotate the free-hand-style unit on its side to play NES software on Revolution.

Q: Can you give us an example of how it might work in a game?

A: Sure. Imagine a fishing game in which the pointer essentially becomes the fisherman's pole. Gamers simply make a casting motion to send the line flying and pull back on the pointer to tug a fish upward once it has taken the bait. In a sequel to Luigi's Mansion, the pointer might be used as a flashlight. Gamers point to the area they want to illuminate and Luigi's flashlight spotlights it. Voila. In a tennis game, the pointer becomes the racquet. Players swing the device as they would a racquet to smash tennis balls back at opponents. The list goes on and on and the options only increase when the peripheral's expansion functionality is considered.

Q: What kinds of expansions are planned?

A: Wide assortments of peripherals are possible, but thus far Nintendo has only officially confirmed two of them. The first is an analog stick/trigger unit that Nintendo has dubbed the "nunchuck-style controller." The second is a conventional controller cradle/shell. Nintendo has also indicated that it might like to explore other expansions. It used Donkey Kong style bongos and a light gun as examples.

Q: What does the nunchuck analog/trigger unit do?

A: The small, ergonomic peripheral attaches to the bottom of the pointer by way of a short cable, and is easily grasped in one hand. The device features a single analog stick on its top side and two triggers, labeled Z trigger 1 and 2, underneath. The unit extends the functionality of the pointer and really shows its usefulness in certain genres, particularly first-person shooters. Imagine the possibilities. With the analog stick in one hand, users move Samus Aran around the environments in Metroid Prime 3, freeing up the pointer to act as the heroine's gun. The result is a level of control so responsive and accurate that its closest rival is a PC/mouse configuration. Incidentally, Retro Studios created a demo of this very setup that was at TGS 2005 previewed to a select group of editors, IGN included, and it was very impressive.

"Our current plan is for each [Revolution] hardware system to be sold with the free-hand-style controller and the nunchuck-style expansion controller," confirms Nintendo of America's senior director of public relations, Beth Llewelyn.

Q: What does the conventional controller cradle/shell do?

A: This add-on makes it possible to play Revolution games in a more traditional manner. The shell is designed to look and function like accepted "regular" controllers, such as the Wave Bird. After its bottom casing is removed, the Revolution's free-hand-style remote is inserted into a gap in the middle of the controller shell. Gamers can then use the shell as they would a traditional controller, with a notable difference: the pointer remote's sensory functionality remains active. As a result, gamers get the best of both worlds: more buttons and two analog sticks along with motion-sensing operations. In a Revolution version of Madden Football, gamers might be able to use the combo to control players with the shell's analog sticks and execute pinpoint passes with the pointer's improved accuracy.

Posted Image

Nintendo has not yet released official imagery of what the controller shell might look like. However, we've created a mock-up (above) based on what we know of its functionality. The real controller shell is likely to connect to the free-hand-style pointer in a very similar fashion. Please note that we realize our model is not entirely to scale, but this is the best we could do on short notice.

Q: What do all of the buttons on the free-hand-style pointer do?

A: The main controller features a D-Pad, an on/off switch and several different face buttons, three of which are dedicated solely to gameplay. Directly below the unit's D-Pad is an oversized A button. Farther down are two more buttons. In officially released screenshots, these buttons were labeled "a" and "b" respectively. However, when Nintendo president Satoru Iwata held the controller up at his Tokyo Game Show 2005 keynote speech, the buttons were clearly labeled "X" and "Y." The buttons were also labeled "X" and "Y" in Nintendo's Revolution controller promo video, which suggests that the final product is much more likely to use the letters.

"The [Revolution controllers shown] are still prototypes so there may be slight changes in the final versions," says Nintendo's Llewelyn.

It should be noted that the oversize A button is used for primary action functionality. It might be used to make a character jump in a first-person shooter, for example. The X and Y buttons are more likely to be used when the controller is turned on its side in order to accommodate classics NES games.

Posted Image

Located in the middle of the controller are three menu-ready buttons: select, home, and start (from left to right). Nintendo has not yet explained what the home button is used for, but it is likely to bring up a Revolution's central operations page -- something akin to Xbox Live. From here, we suspect gamers will be able to manage their downloaded software or go online, among other things.

The only other thing of note on the face of the controller are the blue LED indicators, bottom, that show what controller port the unit is wirelessly using.

The underbelly of the controller features an ergonomic indent directly opposite the top's D-Pad. This area houses the B trigger, which is also considered a primary action button. This button, easily accessed by players, might be used to fire a weapon in a first-person shooter or to grasp an object in a god game.

Q: Does the Revolution's free-hand-style controller use batteries?

A: Yes, although the specifics in that regard are still being determined. We suspect that the unit will use rechargeable batteries and that a charging dock station will be made available either with the console or sold separately. Nintendo may have chosen to attach add-ons to the unit with cables instead of wirelessly in order to avoid further battery issues.

Q: Can users wield two free-hand-style controllers with Revolution games?

A: Yes. Nintendo's Revolution controller promo video shows players using two pointer controllers to execute various gameplay tasks, such as beating virtual drums.

Q: Can four players wield two free-hand-style controllers each?

A: No. Only four free-hand-style controllers can be used total, according to Nintendo. Therefore, if one person used two pointers in a multiplayer game, only two additional people could play, each with one pointer.

Q: Won't potential light gun add-ons fail to work correctly with Revolution owners who use high-definition televisions?

A: No. Revolution's sensory technology does not interface with TV scan lines, as is the standard with traditional light guns. Because of that, light gun games are entirely possible with Revolution regardless of television type.

Q: Has Nintendo revealed all the features of the Revolution controller?

A: No, we don't believe so. Certain secondary features still remain hidden. Nintendo itself may be defining these features even as it tests and reworks the controller.



#53
Durty D

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I really like the mock/dock controller that IGN have shown.

The more i read and see the more i'm impressed.

Most of my fears around 3rd party support have disapeared.

I can't wait to play a sports title with this little beaut !

#54
Thomas Alan

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Very interesting. Nintendo's definitely got something here. Whether it works in mass market, only time will tell.

I think it will largely depend on the first generation of games. If Nintendo is slow out of the box like it was with the DS to capitalize on the new frontiers they've opened for themselves, then they're toast. But if they start taking gaming in new directions right off the bat then they will have something special indeed.

I'd suggest that a delay into 2007 would be preferable to a lackluster launch. It's that important to get it right immediately.

#55
ShadowGhost

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Very interesting idea...looks like we can't rule out Nintendo just yet :)

#56
TuskenRaider

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I'm really warming up to this thing..

#57
Durty D

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Here's a hands-on with metroid prime 2:

quote:


Here's an initial FAQ. More tomorrow.


So what did you play?

I played the Retro-fitted version of Metroid Prime 2: Echoes.

And ...?

It played far better than the original controls. Turning and aiming were instantaneous. Control was absolutely precise.

At a certain point during the demo, one of our designers did a double-jump over a gap and spun a full 180 degrees in midair before landing on the opposite side. When I saw this my arm literally started shaking and had to grab and squeeze the cup holder on my theater seat like Doctor Strangelove to hold my arm steady.

Then he circle-strafed around a Space Pirate.

Yes, circle-strafed.

In Metroid Prime 2.

And that's without target-locking.

How were the controls set up?

It was set up in the "nunchaku" configuration described in the article. On the left controller, the thumbstick controlled player movement, the upper trigger button was assigned to visor-switching, and the lower trigger was assigned to the "scan" function and locking onto a target. On the right controller, the controller itself moved the player's gun independently of the player's view (yes, you could fire at any point on the screen without changing the player view -- the gun tilted to face toward the aim point), the trigger button fired the gun, and three of the buttons controlled jumping, firing missiles, and switching to morphball mode.

How does it compare to a mouse?

From what I experienced, it seemed to be more precise than a mouse, but it's also much faster because it requires only a much smaller movement of the hand to achieve the desired effect. You just instantly point the controller at any part of the screen and bam!, that's where you're looking.

There is no lag.

There is no error.

It took a while to get used to the idea of how little effort is required to play a game with this controller. I kept wanting to lean forward and move the controller closer to the screen, and it took some practice to just sit back and just calmly move my hand ever so slightly.

At one point, someone said, "If you were to play a game with this against someone using a mouse, they'd have no chance against you." I had to admit it was true.

I've been using a mouse and keyboard for gaming for almost as long as I've been a gamer. I've logged over 80 hours so far in Battlefield 2 and I have a level 60 World of WarCraft character. If somebody had tried to tell me before now that a better controller would come along, I would have laughed at them.

But it only took me 5 minutes with the Revolution controller to realize that I don't need to use a mouse ever again.

Let's take a first-person shooter as an example. With a flick of the wrist, you can completely change your aim point from one corner of the screen to the other. Changing your aim point that way would require you to move a mouse all the way across a gamepad and could potentially take up to several seconds of pushing on a thumbstick with a standard console game controller.

Add to that the fact that the controller can correctly interpret roll (rotation of the controller clockwise and counterclockwise) and movement toward the screen or away from it, and you start to get an idea of the universe of new gameplay possibilities that Revolution games will be able to explore.

Gizzard: I would worry that if its in any way sloppily implemented, it will suck bigtime.

No worries in that category. If there was any sloppiness whatsoever, I didn't see it.

I do not expect to be using any other controllers ever again once the Revolution comes out.

The Angriest Smurf: This is cool as a novelty, but how does this lend itself to extended play sessions?

Try it yourself. Then see if you can still call it a novelty.

Trust me, I was very skeptical going into this. That skepticism is gone.

The Angriest Smurf: Could you imagine playing an FPS for over an hour with this without your hands getting tired?

Hell yeah, brother.

I often play Battlefield 2 for up to 3-4 hours in an evening (yes, I'm an addict), and after 10 minutes with the Revolution I'm ready to throw my mouse out the window for good.

When you take into account that the Revolution controller is very light (it seemed to me a bit lighter than I'd expect a TV remote of the same size) and that it's basically effortless to play with it, extended play sessions are a non-issue.

EvaUnit02: My concern is with playing today's standard genres of games. How do I play a racing game? Do I spin the controller around like a steering wheel?

That would be one way to do it.

Given the number of buttons available in the "nunchaku" configuration, combined with the tilt/rotate/push/pull aspects of the controller, I can't think of a game you couldn't easily adapt to the Revolution controller.

EvaUnit02: It's just not going to work.

I have played it. It works brilliantly.

So now that you've played it, what kinds of things do you think are possible with it that weren't possible before?

Off the top of my head:

A tennis game where your motions control the racket directly, and you never have to press a button the entire game.

A Harry Potter game where you can control Harry Potter's magic wand with the Revolution controller, and cast "Expelliarmus" with a few flicks of the wand.

... and where you steer your Quidditch broom just by steering your controller.

A boat racing game that lets you steer entirely by rotating the controller clockwise and counterclockwise.

A fencing game where you can slash, parry, and stab with the controller.

A Nintendogs game that lets you pet your dogs, pull on a leash, or throw a frisbee with the Revolution controller.

A real-time strategy game ... yes, on a console.

Furthermore, I want this RTS game to have a special cargo helicopter unit. Move the controller forward, and the cargo chopper descends and grabs hold of a tank sitting underneath it. Pull the controller toward you, and the cargo chopper lifts the tank into the air. Then you tilt the controller wherever, and the chopper flies over there, and you move the controller forward a bit to lower the tank to the ground again.



#58
Sephi

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Oh, Jesus.

#59
Thomas Alan

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Holy crap, if half of what that says is true, Nintendo just took control of the FPS genre.

#60
Durty D

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quote:


At a certain point during the demo, one of our designers did a double-jump over a gap and spun a full 180 degrees in midair before landing on the opposite side. When I saw this my arm literally started shaking and had to grab and squeeze the cup holder on my theater seat... Then he circle-strafed around a Space Pirate.

Yes, circle-strafed.

In Metroid Prime 2.

And that's without target-locking.



#61
Durty D

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Here's a demo that you can play using your pc:

http://img.photobuck...sedown/revo.swf

#62
TuskenRaider

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it sounds better with every passing word.

#63
Sephi

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Darth D:
Here's a demo that you can play using your pc:

http://img.photobuck...sedown/revo.swf

LMAO

#64
Thomas Alan

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BTW, I beg everyone to just dump all the articles you can find on this thread.

Damn firewall.

#65
Jason Solo

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I certainly loathe RTS...but to bring that to a console to me is a big deal as its a very popular genre.

Most of my questions have already been answered, and this is sounding like it could be really fun.

#66
Positively Kanyon

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That cradle/shell thing they got going there is freaking awesome... Best of both words I say! Offers the revolutionary features yet doesn't alienate all us hardcore games...

son of lucas:
Holy crap, if half of what that says is true, Nintendo just took control of the FPS genre.

I had the exact same reaction! Halo 3 on 360 anyone?

#67
Quasibonko

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I farted. Oh, I thought this thing was super duper spiffy wiffy from the start.... And Malicio smells funny. Not beause of his crotch rot or anything mind you. I date say he has that under contol what with the industrial strength pills he is taking. In any case, I am so gonna trade in my gc for this bad boy.

And DD, only you would be able to find a pic of an a guy stiking a bat into Bill Gates butt. Good one!!

#68
Thomas Alan

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I think we should note:

The Japanese are going to love this.

#69
Game

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im so suprised at the positive reactions this has gotten here, on another games forum i visit all it got was abuse from the "we love sony" people, yet here it has been embraced :P

i personally cant wait for this, i think its going to do exactly what it says on the tin "revelutionize"

#70
Jaded Jedi

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ThE-GaMe:
im so suprised at the positive reactions this has gotten here, on another games forum i visit all it got was abuse from the "we love sony" people, yet here it has been embraced :P

i personally cant wait for this, i think its going to do exactly what it says on the tin "revelutionize"

I think its because most of us are hardcore gamers. The fact that we've lived and breathed gaming systems since the NES (or even before) days shows that once something is different or innovative, we WANT to try it out.

I can even see the most hardcore of Sony or MS fanboys wanting to try this because its different. I think Nintendo is really onto something here and they won't be in direct competitioin with MS or Sony. Sony and MS will battle it out as being a gamers "primary" system, while everyone will want a Revolution as their secondary console.

#71
Jaded Jedi

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Another great thing no one has thought of. This will potentially CHANGE fighting games the way we know it. People complain about how a fighting game will work. Revolution won't have fighting games the way we are used to.

Gone will be the days of learning combos and timing A, A, B, etc. With that controller I imagine fighting games to be in a FPS mode. The outcome of success will only be determined by YOUR reflexes and your strategy. If you see a guy attacking to your left side with a sword, you could pull back to block your sword and hit him with a quick counter-stab. (The revolution not only detects left and right and up and down, but it also detects the distance from the TV meaning moving forward and backwards).

#72
The Shadow

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quote:


At a certain point during the demo, one of our designers did a double-jump over a gap and spun a full 180 degrees in midair before landing on the opposite side. When I saw this my arm literally started shaking and had to grab and squeeze the cup holder on my theater seat like Doctor Strangelove to hold my arm steady.

Then he circle-strafed around a Space Pirate.

Yes, circle-strafed.

In Metroid Prime 2.

And that's without target-locking.

...

From what I experienced, it seemed to be more precise than a mouse, but it's also much faster because it requires only a much smaller movement of the hand to achieve the desired effect. You just instantly point the controller at any part of the screen and bam!, that's where you're looking.

There is no lag.

There is no error.

...

At one point, someone said, "If you were to play a game with this against someone using a mouse, they'd have no chance against you." I had to admit it was true.

Wow - amazing - I can't wait to get my hands on the Revolution now.

If only there was more cross-platform multi-player gaming: imaging Halo 3 being on the Xbox 360 and the Revolution, with the owners of each being able to play against each other...


Where'd you find the MP2 hands-on at Darth D?

#73
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That one article and the fact that theres a controller shell just eliminated all doubts I had about the Revolution.

Well... the only MINOR concern is how much all of this is gonna cost, and whether the controller "shells" will come included with the Nintendo "Wand" (thats what Ill call it) or whether you have to buy them seperately.

#74
The Shadow

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Iwata said in the speech that the analog 'nunchuk' [ :) yes that's what he called it] will be included with the system.

All the info about the 'conventional' shell is coming from Nintendo sources outside of Iwata's speech so it's unclear whether it'll be included. Though I admit it'd be nice to have it included as well.

#75
Durty D

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Just an idea someone had over at 1up:

quote:



Rev Controller as "Invisible Stylus"

can see the Rev controller being used in the same manner as the stylus on the DS. Think of it as an extension of the DS's unique capabilities on the TV, where the TV IS the touchscreen, for lack of a better term.

For example, a Revolution version of Canvas Curse could utilize the remote portion of the controller by the player holding down the B button and drawing the lines on the screen. Or, something to that effect.

I can also envision this controller being used for other DS-type games, where the player can interact more with what is going on on-screen. For example, I see other possible uses being strategy games like Dual Strike where the player points at units and directs them on-screen with the remote.

I think the DS, while a unique platform on its own merits, has proven to Nintendo that players like that type interactivity that only the DS could provide, up until now.

Crazy conspiracy theory time: Remember when the DS stood for Developers System (and not Dual Screen) - I think the DS was released as testing water/grounds for the Revolution.



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