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California Most Hated State by a Landslide


45 replies to this topic

#26
The Chairman

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And Chicago, while being basically an overgrown cow town full of big 10 fatties (that wear sports jerseys when they "go out on the town") and people who couldn't make it in a real city, at least it has some things to do.

Your opinions on Chicago always amuse me. I've never lived in Chicago, and don't feel any particular affinity for it, but c'mon, really? It's an incredibly cosmopolitan and multicultural global powerhouse with *some* of your typical midwestern fatties. NYC has its own trashy native contingent, with the long-mocked guidos merely topping the list of the many tri-state undesirables. Just take a gander next time you're in Murray Hill if you want to see the jersey-wearing douche crowd. The funny thing about NYC is most of its "cool" areas (LES, Williamsburg/Greenpoint, Bushwick) are full of midwestern art and music students who went to live the hipster life in the big city. Your viewpoint on Chicago really reflects the someone ironic ignorance that comes with NYC provincialism. You hang your hat on it being the center of the universe, and while it still dominates the American scene to a waning extent, a handful of Asian cities now make it feel like a sleepy hamlet. If I wanted to live in a reasonably priced city that offered world-class amenities, I'd choose Chicago. If I wanted to live in a vibrant, exciting, modern city that isn't merely resting on its laurels, I'd go with Tokyo, Seoul, Shanghai, Hong Kong, etc. With international travel becoming more the norm, there are fewer reasons to go to NYC every year (especially after 2008). It's starting to feel like a combination of Paris, which is nearing the end of its journey to becoming a dull museum to its past greatness, and Disney World.

Contrast this with Mississippi, which is appropriately in the bottom. Not only is it practically tropical in climate, there is nothing to do there (outside of riverboat casinos), and god help you if you're poor and/or non-white. And since there are only about 3 rich people in MS, poor and/or non-white probably describes you if you grew up there. Really, the bottom 5 oughta be all Southern states, there really isn't anywhere below the Mason-Dixon a civilized person would choose to live. I mean, sure, there's New Orleans, but I don't know any sane person that would actually want to live in that dump, although it can be fun for a week. And Miami isn't part of the South, IMO. The rest of the South's "cities" are either wholly unremarkable, like Raleigh, or are sprawling dismal places, like Atlanta.

All accurate.

Finally, CA at #1 baffles me. I don't get what people dislike about it. Is it the Mexicans? I mean, well, that describes practically the entire Southwest, so that can't be it. Is it the Hollywood Jews? Well, that can't be it either, cause NY isn't on the top 5. Maybe it's all the SF hippies, and while hippies are indeed some of Earth's scum, you're gonna run into hippies in practically every coastal city. That and SF's ideal weather makes up for the hippies. Not to mention there is a vibrant finance industry in SF, so you can isolate yourself from the leftists if you so choose.

Loony leftists or not, I think San Francisco is easily the most desirable metro area in the country. The Redwoods, Sierras, Lake Tahoe, Pacific Ocean all nearby, a magical Mediterranean climate, fresh produce year-round with one of the best food scenes and the best wine and beer producing regions in the country, all anchored by a vibrant, historical city. Also, do people still talk about hippies? I mean, I think they exist in some college towns, PIRG campaigns and the Haight, but most urban culture is no dominated by the undefined "hipster" aesthetic.

#27
Ms. Spam

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While SF is desireable, it is also NYC pricing and most people are forced to live in Oakland or somewhere between SF and Sacremento to have that SF lifestyle.

I also think that hippies still exist but in a weird way. I think they are Occupy participants and tea party yokels now in my parlance.

#28
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I love Chicago. Least pretentious big city in the country, great food, great music. I try to go a couple times a year.
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#29
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I've always felt like I would fit in okay in Chicago. Which is funny cause I've never been there.

#30
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I would hate the lack of seasons. It would **** my biological clock all up, like this (lack of) winter has

#31
The Chairman

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While SF is desireable, it is also NYC pricing and most people are forced to live in Oakland or somewhere between SF and Sacremento to have that SF lifestyle.

Only if you're not willing to adjust appropriately. I don't mind living in small living spaces if I can be in the most interesting neighborhood in an awesome city. If I wanted to live in a house, I'd move to Portland or Denver. As it is, the places I've chosen to live require $2,000 minimum for a 1-bedroom apartment, which kinda sucks, but I think worth it.

Edited by The Chairman, 11 March 2012 - 09:00 AM.


#32
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I love Chicago. Least pretentious big city in the country, great food, great music. I try to go a couple times a year.


Very fun to visit, less fun to live in. Problem is you're inundated with months of a "Game of Thrones"-esque blizzard.

Edited by The Chairman, 11 March 2012 - 08:54 AM.


#33
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That's what I've been told! Had a friend fromchicago here this weekend getting away from the cold. I know my views are tarnished as I've never been there in high summer or winter.

#34
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Chairman:

Your opinions on Chicago always amuse me. I've never lived in Chicago, and don't feel any particular affinity for it, but c'mon, really? It's an incredibly cosmopolitan and multicultural global powerhouse with *some* of your typical midwestern fatties. NYC has its own trashy native contingent, with the long-mocked guidos merely topping the list of the many tri-state undesirables. Just take a gander next time you're in Murray Hill if you want to see the jersey-wearing douche crowd. The funny thing about NYC is most of its "cool" areas (LES, Williamsburg/Greenpoint, Bushwick) are full of midwestern art and music students who went to live the hipster life in the big city. Your viewpoint on Chicago really reflects the someone ironic ignorance that comes with NYC provincialism. You hang your hat on it being the center of the universe, and while it still dominates the American scene to a waning extent, a handful of Asian cities now make it feel like a sleepy hamlet. If I wanted to live in a reasonably priced city that offered world-class amenities, I'd choose Chicago. If I wanted to live in a vibrant, exciting, modern city that isn't merely resting on its laurels, I'd go with Tokyo, Seoul, Shanghai, Hong Kong, etc. With international travel becoming more the norm, there are fewer reasons to go to NYC every year (especially after 2008). It's starting to feel like a combination of Paris, which is nearing the end of its journey to becoming a dull museum to its past greatness, and Disney World.


Amuse you? Why is that? For someone that's never lived there nor felt any affinity for it, color me curious as to why you're so defensive about the city.
Incredibly cosmopolitan and multicultural global powerhouse? You have got to be sh-tting me. Yes, for American standards, yeah- it's practically Constantinople. But if you're going to bring in the entire world into it, which you did by your use of the word "global," then you better be prepared to defend that claim. I'll admit to some anti-Chicago bias, so let's look at some other measures. The 2011 Global Power City Index does not have Chicago in the top 25, and that is a pretty good index, with the exception of Boston at #16, which is pretty stupid. The 2010 World City Survey has it ranked at #11, which is about as high as I think any reasonable person would put it. The GaWC Research Bulletins have usually ranked Chicago as an Alpha city (or in their latest ranking, an Alpha+), but those rankings are completely ridiculous, it has Chicago above Beijing, L.A., and Seoul, which is comical, and yet absurd, in the same way that watching retards fling poo at each other is. And even so, NYC is still higher (an Alpha++).

The only reason anyone would call it a global powerhouse, is simply because it has a high GDP, but that doesn't necessarily equate to "power." For example, guess how many Fortune 500 companies are headquartered in Chicago? 8. That's right. The same number as St. Louis, and behind Minneapolis. Guess how many are in NYC? 45. Face it, Chicago probably just has a high GDP by virtue of the fact that lots of people live there and there is a huge f-cking airport. But whoope freaking do, Atlanta has a really big/busy airport too.

As far as cosmopolitan- I don't even think I need to indulge in this. You do realize it's in the midwest, right? Where "fat" was invented? Where people pride themselves on being all "low key" and "down to earth," and not like those "uptight, pretentious East Coast people." I mean, I'm not sure that when people think of glitz and what not, their mind immediately turns to the oh-so Magnificant Mile. Hollywood Hills, the Upper East Side, that's different.

Murray Hill and Guidos- I mean, whatever. You've named one small subsection, and besides, most of em don't even live in Manhattan, but in Jersey or Long Island. If you get to bring those in, then I get to bring in any of the never-ending/ugly Northwest Chicago suburbs. Your point that "cool" NYC areas, like the hipster areas, attract a bunch of midwesterners kinda just proves my point. Everyone comes to NYC for a reason. I don't hear anyone leaving the city to "go make it" in Chicago, or wherever the bumf-ck in the Midwest. People leave NY for only two reasons: a) they couldn't afford it anymore, or b) They realized they would never be anything but a small fish in a big sea in NY, and wanted to go back to an area where people would actually pay attention to their boring, fat and ugly ass. Also, the fact that these hipster areas are the "cool" ones to you, tell me that you probably were never actually invited/nor know about the upper circles of Manhattan, and we definitely don't hang out in freaking Williamsburg. Oh Chairman, lol lol lol.

Finally, your point about provincialism and Asian cities is a crock of sh-t. First off, I have been to Asia over 20 times, something I doubt you have done. I have gone to every single continent in the world except Antarctica and seen it all. To refer to NYC as a sleepy hamlet- Chairman, if you're trying to get a rise out of me, you're gonna have to do better than that. NYC is on the top of every single global city list I provided above, in fact, the GaWC ranks it as one of only two Alpha++ cities (London being the other). I would list off all the international institutions, companies, and cultural points that NYC has but that would be a waste of time, since its just self-evident, and you know just as I do, that you're full of sh-t. "Resting on its laurels" is a bit of a stretch I think- I mean, sure maybe in 30 years, or 50, it will become like Paris, but even the "downfall" of great previous cities like Paris, Constantinople, and Rome took hundreds of years, not 10. And some never even really fell (even though their country diminished in power)- look at London, for example.

I will agree that many Asian cities are just as (if not moreso) "vibrant, exciting, modern," as you say, than NYC, but a) I never claimed NYC was the greatest city in the world (although it is quite obviously the best of the US), and b) I never claimed it was even my favorite (if I knew Mandarin or Japanese, I would've moved to Hong Kong or Tokyo long, long ago.. and I still really want to move to Singapore too). But when you say "If I wanted to live in a reasonably priced city that offered world-class amenities, I'd choose Chicago," what I hear is, "If I wanted a reasonably priced car that offered luxury amenities, I'd buy the Hyundai with the leather seat option."

LOL Chairman, just LOL.

#35
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To refer to NYC as a sleepy hamlet- Chairman, if you're trying to get a rise out of me, you're gonna have to do better than that.

I dunno, Amanda. Looks like he succeeded pretty well, to me.

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#36
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Yeah, I knew someone would say that, and guess what, you're wrong; because Chairman typed up a pretty long paragraph himself, and while Chairman isn't the most concise of us, he usually doesn't write that much either. He was serious. If I wrote that much in response to one of Darth Krawlie's one-liners, then you'd have a point.

#37
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The 2011 Global Power City Index does not have Chicago in the top 25, and that is a pretty good index, with the exception of Boston at #16, which is pretty stupid.


Should Boston be higher or lower, in your opinion? I bet I know already...New Yorkers and Bostonians aren't friendly with each other.

#38
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I only WISH I could write a one liner good enough to get someone to reply that much.

#39
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Lower, but it's not because I have anything really against the place. Well, I do think it's basically made up of either a) college kids or b) annoying New England micks/people that are way too obsessed with the Red Sox. But, unlike some New Yorkers, I don't go crazy about it.

But as I said, probably lower, and because it's basically just a regional city whose importance is almost entirely due to academic institutions and the bio-tech industry. And admittedly, it is pretty important in both those categories, but I think it would have to have at least a couple more big categories to make it on a global list (such as population, number of fortune 500 companies, GDP, international institutions, importance to global economy, etc.)

A metro area of comparable size to Boston (and with significantly more global importance) would be the SF Bay Area.

#40
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pavonis

Lower, but it's not because I have anything really against the place. Well, I do think it's basically made up of either a) college kids or b) annoying New England micks/people that are way too obsessed with the Red Sox. But, unlike some New Yorkers, I don't go crazy about it.

But as I said, probably lower, and because it's basically just a regional city whose importance is almost entirely due to academic institutions and the bio-tech industry. And admittedly, it is pretty important in both those categories, but I think it would have to have at least a couple more big categories to make it on a global list (such as population, number of fortune 500 companies, GDP, international institutions, importance to global economy, etc.)

A metro area of comparable size to Boston (and with significantly more global importance) would be the SF Bay Area.


Well, it is made up of mostly college kids - there's about 50 colleges and universities in the area. Of course, only two of them are any good. When I lived there, all I ever saw were college kids. Of course, I was working at MIT, so being surrounded by college students daily might have biased experience....

#41
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I only WISH I could write a one liner good enough to get someone to reply that much.


Tell Ming the Beatles suck.
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#42
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Forgive me if I'm stating the obvious, but I'm pretty sure the Illinois hate is because Obama "came" from there. And yeah, Chicago is fairly liberal, but outside of Chicago, it is pretty much indistinguishable from the rest of the midwest. Cows, corn, and FLAT. Very red state, too. There's a reason we joke that anything south of I-80 is southern IL.

For my California friends, I'm glad you love Chicago so much but I'm pretty sure you would turn into a popsicle if you visited in the winter. My southern Californian husband has declared Chicago the coldest place he's ever been (and this was on a layover from CANADA), and has pretty much promised me he will divorce me if I try to make him relocate there. He barely tolerates Seattle weather. He's also decided if he becomes CEO of the company we work for, he will move the HQ from Chicago to southern Cal or Hawaii, real estate prices and corporate tax breaks be damned.

#43
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I really miss ming.

I'm pretty sure he posted stoned half the time, and he went on these rants that made me look concise in comparison (and they were even more incoherent). Not to mention he had the most contradictory, odd political positions (like being really libertarianish on some social issues, and also pro war/imperialism... made no sense).

All that said, I still miss the guy. Oh well.

#44
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I only WISH I could write a one liner good enough to get someone to reply that much.


Tell Ming the Beatles suck.


Oh he knows I'm gonna use that one on him, doesn't seem to phase him anymore... at least in person. I haven't seen him in about a year. We drank at a nearby bar and then he passed out on my couch. We've been texting on the occasional odd weekend to try to hang out, but it never seems to work out.

I blame him.

#45
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I had to break up with him after he yelled at mom on facebook over an MLK quote.

#46
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Whoa. Crazy NYC provincialism itt



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