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Toy Story 3


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102 replies to this topic

#1
Wally Q

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From ComingSoon.net:

The Walt Disney Company reported its second quarter and six months results on Tuesday (full details here) and Chief Executive Robert Iger also gave an update on Toy Story 3 in a conference call.

Iger revealed that Walt Disney Pictures has started production on Toy Story 3, but no release date has been set for the third installment. The studio may also do other sequels of Pixar films.

After Disney acquired Pixar, Pixar took over production of Toy Story 3, which Disney's in-house animators had been working on.


If you're curious about the business side of Disney, go here.

Just as long as John Lasseter comes back to direct it, I'll be a happy guy.

And can we get an Incredibles sequel soon?

#2
Ryn

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I like Lasseter being in the mix. He and his people can only benefit Disney.

#3
lugh

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Is there any way that Toy Story 3 could be any good even with John Lasseter? There's no where to really go with the story. They already did the "Andy's going to grow up and not want to play with toys any more" plot in Toy Story 2. So will Buzz and Woody be hand-me-downs in 3? Anyone else notice that all Disney has been doing in the last 6 years or so has been releasing unnecessary sequels to their movies? Including a Bambi 2, Tarzan 2 and all the Lion Kings and Alladins sequels that don't make any sense. For example Bambi 2 and Tarzan 2 both just extended storys of the main characters as children. They can't come up with any new adventures for sequels because their stories were completed in the originals. I'm afriad TS3 will be the same.

#4
Ryn

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Pocohantas 2 was a natural extension of the original.

Really, I recall a lot of people waying "Why?" upon hearing a Toy Story 2 was being made.

#5
Wally Q

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Oh I think there's a lot they could do with a third installment.

#6
QueenWoodRat

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" To Infinity & Beyond!."



:thumbsup:

#7
Thomas Alan

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Anyone else notice that all Disney has been doing in the last 6 years or so has been releasing unnecessary sequels to their movies?


Disney closed all its feature animation studios after Treasure Planet bombed in 2002 (Brother Bear and Home on the Range were cheaply finished and released).

Now even the cheapquel studio in Australia is being closed so we won't be seeing Snow White: Part 4 anytime soon (thank God).

Disney is dead. Really, I don't see how they can ever be revived again. At least in the 70s and 80s they had a bunch of old hands from the Golden Age still around and teaching the craft to the young animators. But Ollie Johnston is the only member of the "Nine Old Men" still alive and long since retired (though his book, co-authored with Frank Thomas, "The Illusion of Life" remains the animators' bible even in today's CGI dominated marketplace).

If Disney ever gets back into traditional animation, it will be a completely new animal.

#8
Wally Q

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John Lasseter is Walt Disney incarnate. Disney is far from dead; if Walt were still alive, I doubt he'd disapprove of the quality of work that Pixar is producing in terms of storytelling as well as technical innovation.

#9
lugh

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Disney is dead. Really, I don't see how they can ever be revived again. At least in the 70s and 80s they had a bunch of old hands from the Golden Age still around and teaching the craft to the young animators. But Ollie Johnston is the only member of the "Nine Old Men" still alive and long since retired (though his book, co-authored with Frank Thomas, "The Illusion of Life" remains the animators' bible even in today's CGI dominated marketplace).

If Disney ever gets back into traditional animation, it will be a completely new animal.


Very insightful SonofLucas. There have been times over the years when Disney was considered dead. In the deep dark days in the early to mid- 80's gave us such awful movies as the Black Cauldron. But you're right, even then they had Golden Age guys around. However isn't Jeffery Katzenberg credited with the reviving of the art of the animated feature film with The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, etc? When he left it seems the movies turned a corner and eventually jumped the shark.

OK this is way OT, so "Somebody poisoned the water hole!"

#10
Boba Sweat

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i think too much trade is being put in cgi these days
there are a lot of **** films out there, that rely on having famous voices rather than a decent story (see madagascar and robots)

i reckon if disney were to got back to cartoons, and work on an original story, they might well have a hit on their hands
after all thats what the lion king was, and it's arguably the best disney cartoon ever made

sure throw in the famous voices, but concentrate on the story
because if the store works, it doesn't matter if it's cgi or not

#11
D-Ray Kenobi

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Traditional animation is dead for a good while. The target audience, the kids who drag along thier parents, just aren't going to go see something that other kids will make fun of them for. The cold hard truth is CGI is so hot, even stupid and idiotic movies made in CGI will do well. Case in point, "Hoodwinked".

#12
Thomas Alan

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John Lasseter is Walt Disney incarnate. Disney is far from dead; if Walt were still alive, I doubt he'd disapprove of the quality of work that Pixar is producing in terms of storytelling as well as technical innovation.


If anyone today has a claim to the title of Walt Disney's heir, it's Japan's Hayao Miyazaki just in terms of pure creative wattage and versatility. But even he is a leagues behind Disney.

Lasseter is a quality storyteller and has his company moving in the right direction, but I'd be hardpressed to put him near the top of any list of animation greats.

For the record, everyone is 70 years behind Disney at this point. There have been a lot of innovations that I'm sure Walt would appreciate, but in terms of pure animation Fantasia, Dumbo, and Bambi remain unsurpassed.

However isn't Jeffery Katzenberg credited with the reviving of the art of the animated feature film with The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, etc?


Unjustifiably credited.

Katzenberg advocated dismantling the animation division when he and Eisner first appeared and even personally took the scissors to "The Black Cauldron" to tone down the climax.

It was only the success of An American Tale, particularly after it reached home video. When they saw the cash cow, Katzenberg and Eisner gave the studio the resources they had been denying them and they went to work reviving Disney's flagging feature division. They released the bomb Oliver and Company in 1988 as a learning experience, and then the young animators figured things out with The Little Mermaid (and reached even greater heights with the little seen The Rescuers Down Under).

Ironically, Katzenberg's later partner Steven Spielberg deserves more credit for saving American animation than Katzenberg. If it were left to Katzenberg, there would never have been an animation reviaval in the United States.

When he left it seems the movies turned a corner and eventually jumped the shark.


Before he left, Katzenberg greenlit Pocahontas and The Hunchback of Notre Dame and saw Pocahontas through most of its production. That was the turning point for the studio.

Disney's problem wasn't that Katzenberg left. It was that they remade Ariel from The Little Mermaid half a dozen times and, with Pocahontas, it finally caught up with them. That was Katzenberg's fault more than anyones.

The quality of their films (and even box office) actually increased for a period of time after Katzenberg's influence wore off (Hercules, Mulan, Tarzan, Fantasia 2000), so it's difficult to say that the studio collapsed without his hand.

i reckon if disney were to got back to cartoons, and work on an original story, they might well have a hit on their hands


It will happen, but I doubt it will be Disney. Disney has abdicated the throne.

#13
Wally Q

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John Lasseter, the co-founder and creative leader of Pixar, has acknowledged that he worried endlessly during the protracted negotiations with Disney about the possibility that Disney would produce sequels to the original Pixar films like Toy Story and Monsters, Inc. if a deal extending their relationship wasn't concluded. In an interview with Fortune magazine, Lasseter said, "It would have been easier just to walk away, but Steve [Jobs] stayed in there for me, because I loved these characters that we have created. They're like family, like children. And if we didn't get a deal, Disney would own our children. Who knew what they would do? These were the people that put out Cinderella II. We believe that the only reason to do a sequel is if you have a great story, period. It's not 'Let's just keep cranking it out.'" Lasseter said that he and Jobs decided to wait until Michael Eisner left as CEO of the studio before resuming negotiations with Disney, and that he received a phone call from Robert Iger on the day he was named to succeed Eisner. "And that said a lot to us, because he was serious about wanting to make a deal with us to keep distributing our films. He understood that the biggest issue for us wasn't money, but to have control of our characters." When he heard that Disney wanted to take over Pixar, Lasseter recalled, "at first I was very nervous." However, he added, Jobs reassured him, saying, "Get to know Bob Iger. That's all I can say. He's a good man."


That's from IMDb and it just proves to my why I have faith in the guys at Pixar to produce exceptional sequels or else not make them.

#14
Thomas Alan

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#15
Ryn

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From Cartoon Brew:

John Lasseter Interview
Posted by AMID at 04:33 AM

This FORTUNE magazine interview with John Lasseter is a good read. The piece has the most extensive comments I've seen from Lasseter regarding the Pixar/Disney negotiations. There's also some other good stories where Lasseter describes his experience on BRAVE LITTLE TOASTER and also explains the sure-fire sign that you've made a poor family film.

(Thanks, Jamie Badminton)



#16
hottiehayden2140

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I'm telling this to my brother,he'll be so excited.

#17
Brett

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awesome

#18
mistershow

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I really like that they take their time with these...I mean hasn't it been almost a decade since the original?? And it's still such a recognizable and bankable franchise.

#19
Joey Tribbiani

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I've always liek Toy Story. its a cool movie.

#20
Ryn

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Lasseter "Definitely Doing Hand-Drawn"

#21
monkeygirl

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I got some inside info on this last night; it ain't happening.

I work with someone who knows Lasseter. He tells me Disney and Pixar went through another power struggle over how profits were being split. Disney wanted 50/50 because they put up the money. Pixar wanted 70/30 because it's their product and figured they could get anyone to bankroll and merchandise. Pixar wasn't giving in, so Disney decided to strong-arm them by beginning production on Toy Story III, which made Pixar sick to their stomaches so they caved.

When Disney put Lasseter back in charge, he killed it, saying he never saw the need for a Toy Story III to begin with or he's have done one himself.

Edited by monkeygirl, 16 June 2006 - 06:44 PM.


#22
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My first impulse is to say "that sucks" but if there isn't a great story there, why do it? It would be awful and I would be irritated.

#23
monkeygirl

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According to this guy, who I do trust, that's Lassater's take on it; if there WAS a story to do, he'd have done it. He likened this to a thug coming into your home nd wrecking your kids' toys...the company that bankrolled it and technically legally owned the characters, makinga crappy movie with them on PURPOSE, just out of spite.

#24
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Interesting turn of events. :hmm:

I could live without a Toy Story 3. :shrug:

Moreso than I could if they bastardized the characters and story with a third one. :unimpressed:

#25
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The cold hard truth is CGI is so hot, even stupid and idiotic movies made in CGI will do well. Case in point, "Hoodwinked".



Oh.....that movie was one of the worst things I ever had to sit through!! I think I lost part of my vision due to rolling my eyes so much! Not only that, but the animation was so horrible. The Geico lizard is easier on the eyes! :rolleyes:

I watched it because my friend said it was the funniest movie she had seen in a while. (They don't get out much these day. :hmm: ) Anyway....I had just seen "Over the Hedge" and was ravinng about it, so they said, I would like this one! WRONG! I chuckled maybe ONCE, and the rest of it was stomach churning! The whol time I was thinking....who was the idiot that Green-Lit this steaming pile!?!???? He should be fired into the next lifetime!

HOR-I-BLE!!!

:thumbsdown: :thumbsdown: :thumbsdown: :thumbsdown: